Skip to main content
Internet Archive's 25th Anniversary Logo

Full text of "National Register Nominations for Chicago"

See other formats


United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 



n hi 



For NPS use only 

National Register of Historic Places «<**« 

Inventory— Nomination Form da,e enlered 

See instructions in How to Complete National Register Forms 

Type all entries— complete applicable sections ____ _ 

1. Name 



Sheridan__Park__Hi stori c Di strict _ 



and or common 



2. Location 



street & number Bounded by Lawrence Ave nue on the north, Montrose Ave nue not tor publication 
orrtne~SBircn , a nd rough l y by CTai-IT'ST. on the west ana Kacine Avenue on the east: 

city, town Chicago - vicinity ot _____ 



111 inois 



3. Classification 



Category 

X district 



Ownership 

X public 

building(s) X. private 

structure both 

..._ site Public Acquisition 

object m ifr in process 

being considered 



Status 

X occupied 
_X_ unoccupied 

work in progress 

Accessible 

yes: restricted 

X yes: unrestricted 



Present Use 

agriculture 
X commercial 
X educational 
___ entertainment 

__ government 

. industrial 

military 



_ museum 

_ park 

_ private residence 

_ religious 

_ scientific 

_ transportation 

_ other: 



4- Owner of Property 



Multiple public and private 



street & number 



5. Location of Legal Description 



courthouse, registry of deeds, et c. Recorder of De eds , Cook Count y Build i ng 



street & number 



_ 118 North Clark St _ 



Chicago 



state Illinois 



6. Representation in Existing Surveys 



(a) Illinois Historic Structures Survey 



titl e (b) Register 

(a) c. 1972 
date (h) nn-gning 



has this property been determined ^Jigible? 



^S. state county X* local 



(a) Dept. of Conservation 

depos itory for s urvey records _j^..__Cairois_4©n On Ch*€agG-l^fKrffKrH« 

(a) Sprinqfield ... . 

city. town. _ibl_c.hnE.ago ..... . .._. - ....... mi.nons 



7. Description 



Condition 

_A_ excellent 


_*_ deteriorated 


Check one 


Check one 


...A- unaltered 


X . original site 


X_ good 


ruins 


X altered 


moved date 


X f&ir 


unexposed 







Describe the present and original (if known) physical appearance 



Summary 



Sheridan Park is an old, clearly defined Chicago residential neighborhood 
containing a distinctive mix of houses, walk-up apartments and apartment 
hotels built between 1891 and 1929, remarkably free from intrusions. The 
large lots laid out by the subdividers, predominantly fifty feet wide, 
strongly influenced each successive wave of development: first the large 
suburban-style houses, built at a steady pace from 1891 to 1909 with a few 
as late as 1915 and even 1920; then the walk-up apartments and especially 
six-flats, built between 1897 and 1927; and finally a small number of hotels 
and common-corridor apartment buildings, built from 1910 to 1929. 



Situation , orientation , building lines , scale 

Sheridan Park lies astride Graceland Spit, a sandy ridge rising about 20 
feet above the flat plain of geological Lake Chicago. Graceland and St. 
Boniface cemeteries', situated on the ridge to exploit the well-drained, 
sandy soil, form the northern and southern boundaries of the neighborhood. 
The heavily traveled boundary streets, Montrose and Lawrence Avenues, and 
the high masonry enclosing walls of the cemeteries close the area 
emphatically in these directions. 

The north-south streets, Magnolia, Maiden, Beacon, and Dover, angle 
slightly but perceptibly to take up the northwesterly angle of Clark Street 
(formerly Green Bay Road). The subtle bending of the street and, in some 
places, the curving of the sidewalk, contribute further to a feeling of 
closure. Virtually all the buildings face these north-south streets, except 
for a handful of apartment buildings and a few store buildings. Even the 
large corner apartments tend to have principal entrances at the short east 
or west elevation, (The 6-story Leland Hotel and the 12-story Norman Hotel 
are striking exceptions.) 

On all these interior north-south streets, building lines, varying from 
15 to 50 feet deep, establish a wide thoroughfare and help to preserve a 
suburban atmosphere despite the predominance of apartment buildings. Only a 
few postwar apartments encroach upon the original building lines, and these 
are still set back from the sidewalk, if not so far as their older 
neighbors. 

The east-west streets are continuations of streets in the Chicago grid. 
They run true to the compass. However, they are cut off visually on the 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service fotnps «.<*>* 

National Register of Historic Places -*** 
Inventory— Nomination Form *«.«*««< 

Continuation sheet Sheridan Park H. D. Item number 7 . Description Page 2 



east by the railway tracks, and the rise of the land gives them a special 
character in the western part of the district, cutting off the long 
uninterrupted vistas which are typical of most of Chicago's street grid. 

The buildings in their ensemble, though varied, establish a strong sense 
of scale, deriving primarily from the uniform 50-foot frontage of the 
original subdivisions. Only a small number of courtyard apartment buildings 
- about 15 - are wider than 50 or 60 feet. 

Perhaps Stockton School (built 1924-25) is the most striking exception to 
the horizontal scale, as befits a public building. The original 3-story 
section is quite compatible with the surrounding area, but later additions, 
and considerable demolition of houses and two-flats to provide play space 
and parking, have damaged the physical relationship of the school complex to 
the neighborhood. 

The vertical scale is also dominated by the 2- and 3-story buildings of 
the early years. There are only 6 buildings out of 369 which are taller 
than four stories, and they all date from the 1920s. The postwar buildings 
(15 of them) are all one to three stories high. Moreover, these modest 
intrusions are generally built of brick and though obtrusive are not 
destructive. An exception may be made for Uptown Center of Hull House, an 
aggressively modern concrete block; but even this objectionable structure is 
set well back and stands no higher than its neighbors. 

Dover Street is built on a smaller scale than the others. At the turn of 
the century several real-estate developers resubdivided sections of Dover 
Street, usually into 33-foot lots. As a result, Dover Street never went 
through the later stages of development which affected the other streets, 
and the deeper setbacks, especially north of Wilson, also contribute to a 
special scale. Moreover, the 4400 block of Dover was subdivided into 
25-foot lots and most of these lots were built up with two-flats, giving a 
character to this block which is unique in the district but not incompatible 
with the rest of Dover Street. 

Even a cursory glance at a building-structure map reveals the general 
uniformity of the 50-foot scale on most of the streets and the finer scale . 
on most of Dover Street. 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service ** Hn «• «* 

National Register of Historic Places ««*«» 
Inventory— Nomination Form **«*■« 

Sheridan Park H.D. item number 7 - Description page S 



Continuation sheet 



Building stock 

Of the 369 buildings in the district, 103 are six-flats, and in many 
respects this is the dominant building type. However, there are 62 
single-family residences and 50 two-flats. Since many of the two-flats are 
not only similar in scale and character to the single residences, but often 
are practically indistinguishable from them, these 112 small residences also 
play a dominant role. 

The one- and two-family buildings fall naturally into two classes: the 
63 on Dover Street, most of which stand on 33-foot lots, and those on 
Beacon, Maiden, and Magnolia, most of which stand on 50-foot lots and are 
generally older and larger. These large old houses date between 1892 and 
1907. They include two stonefronts, eight brick houses, and about two dozen 
frame houses, roughly half of which are currently covered with inappropriate 
siding. Stylistically most may be characterized as "Victorian," a term 
sufficiently vague to encompass a very diverse and interesting collection of 
buildings few of which are pure examples of one specific style or another. 
Traces of the stick style, the shingle style, the American Queen Anne, and 
the lonic-Palladian phase of the Colonial Revival may be found in these 
houses . Many of them have round or octagonal towers , a variety of gables 
and dormers, projecting bays, open front porches, and other such features of 
the period. 

These houses with their picturesque exteriors play an important role in 
defining the character of the district. Although scattered on perhaps eight 
different blocks of the three streets, they occur in pairs or clusters which 
enhance their impact. Such clusters occur in the 4700 and 4500 blocks of 
Beacon (in the latter case, siding and remodeling detract from the effect); 
see Photos 1 and 3. Pairs of such houses are frequent, and in fact there is 
not a single case of a large Victorian house squeezed between two six-flats 
or larger buildings. One grand Victorian stands alone on the busy corner of 
Wilson and Maiden, with 300 feet of vacant land next door. 

On Dover Street the median date of the one- and two-family residences is 
1907 (dates range from 1896 to 1920), and the character is different. An 
"olde English" quality is noticeable and will be explained in the section on 
significance. Elements of Tudor or Gothic styles may be seen on many of 
these buildings. There are also many four-square houses and no-nonsense 
two-flats on Dover Street which give a mixture of suburban and city flavor. 
Two large Victorian frame houses preside at 4618-20 Dover and at the corner 
of Dover and Leland . Finally, a Prairie School two-flat stands at 4707 
Dover, and another one, very remarkable, at 4641 (Photo 6). 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service f« nps ■». only 

National Register of Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form 

Continuation sheet Sheridan Park h. P. item number ?» Description Page 4 



Six-flats are literally everywhere in the district; there is at least one 
six-flat on every block of every interior street, with one exception - the 
4500 block of Maiden, which does nevertheless have an apartment hotel at 
4550 that looks rather like a six-flat. Several blocks consist of nothing 
else but six-flats, from corner to corner; see Photo 10. The blocks south 
of Sunnyside have this character, due to their sudden and rapid development 
at a later date. But several other blocks have rows of six-flats no two of 
which are alike. On the 4600 block of Beacon there is a row, all different, 
with. round bays, built in 1901-05; see Photo 8. A similar row stands on the 
4500 block of Magnolia but dilapidated. On the 4700 block of Beacon no two 
six-flats are alike but there is a feeling of ensemble which derives as 
elsewhere from the common scale and setback. See Photo 11. Rows on the 
4600 blocks of Magnolia and Maiden are less readily characterized. 

Almost all of these six-flats are 50 to 60 feet wide and three stories 
high, with a center entrance. The earlier ones are often built with a stone 
front, smooth or rough, and with a prominent entrance. Later, brick is used 
exclusively, with stone or terra cotta trim, and tiers of enclosed sun 
parlors dominate the effect. Between these groups in date and style there 
are a number of six-flats with exterior porches or balconies. 

The effect of a neighborhood of six-flats is strengthened by the fact 
that many or most of the corner apartment buildings are designed so that 
they look like six-flats (or rows of six-flats) from the front. See for 
example Photo 9. Most corners carry larger buildings with separate 
entrances front and side, and may be thought of as groups of three- and 
six-flats; in fact, they were often built that way, as may be seen from the 
city permit files. 

There are about 15 courtyard buildings. They range in date from 1909 to 
1925. Here the mentality of a separate entrance for each three or six 
families is maintained , but the horizontal scale changes because at least 
100 or 120 front feet or more are required to make room for the courtyard. 

A few curious deviations in apartment planning will be found. Three 
buildings are "half-courtyards," i.e., they stand on a single lot but one 
side is set back, finished in face brick, and has entrances, as if the 
building were only the first phase of an unfinished program to build a full 
courtyard building. At 4646 Magnolia this is known to be the case. Two 
buildings have courtyards but there are no entrances in the courts. At 4501 
Maiden on a lot 200 feet by 122 a U-shaped building with a very deep 
courtyard (in the long direction) is entered only from the side, through a 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service F«Hrau««t> 

National Register of Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form < 

Continuation sheet Sheridan Park Historic Item number 7, Description Page 5 



single entrance, and Is in fact a common corridor apartment hotel. Across 
the street at 4500 Maiden there is a "reverse courtyard" building: three 
wings come forward to the building line, each with its entrance; between, 
two courtyards give light and air but not access. 

After the building code changes of 1919-1922 and the new zoning code of 
1923, hotels and kitchenette apartment hotels were built In the district. 
Nineteen of them still stand. Their dates range from 1923 to 1929. (The 
Darlington Hotel at Racine and Leland dates from 1910.) The building code 
required fireproof construction for buildings of four or more stories. 
Accordingly, most of these buildings were "three stories plus English 
basement," to avoid the expense of fireproof construction; some of them look 
very much like four-story buildings to the unaided eye. Most were built on 
interior lots and they often look rather like the six-flats nearby. Twin 
six-story apartment hotels at 4536-40 Magnolia and the Maiden Towers at 4521 
Maiden represent the maximum of mid-block development. Finally the peak is 
reached with the 5-story Northgate at Beacon and Leland, the 6-story Leland 
Hotel at Leland and Racine (Photo 13) the 12-story Norman Hotel at Wilson 
and Beacon. Standing as they do on corners, and in the latter two cases on 
or near major thoroughfares, these buildings do not break with the building 
tradition in the neighborhood but begin to threaten its scale. However, no 
postwar high-rises have followed. 

The hotels and apartment hotels change the density and perhaps the 
psychology of the neighborhood, but not necessarily the scale. Mid-block 
common-corridor buildings like 4545 Beacon, 4550 Maiden, and 4706 and 4735 
Beacon look rather like six-flats, with their three-story fronts and center 
entrances. These examples have just six apartments in the front. In other 
cases, four or five apartments were placed in the front on every floor, and 
the design necessarily divulges this; but the scale is not always affected. 
An interesting example Is seen at 4626 Magnolia, which has four units across 
the front on each floor, but is imaginatively designed and scaled so that it 
actually seems smaller and possibly more domestic than the 1902 four-story 
eight -flat next door (see photo 12). 

On Clark Street a commercial character predominates. The purely 
commercial buildings have been left out of the district, but two kinds of 
store-and-flats buildings are of sufficient interest to be included. The 
first consists of three buildings of individual architectural interest: the 
corner buildings at Montrose and Clark, by Walter for Coorlas (1908), with 
their elaborate entrances; the "Montrose" next door at 4405-09, by Steinbach 
& Lampe for Cocklan (1927), with its terra-cotta front; and the splendid 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service man — ** 

National Register of Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form 

Continuation sheet Sheridan Park Historic ltemnumber 7, Description Page 6 

D i JU ill — — — ^— — -^— ^— — ^— ^— — — — — — 



terra-cotta Issel Building at Wilson Avenue, designed In 1929 by Johnson & 
Johnson, architects with offices a few blocks north on Clark Street. 

The second consists of a row of a dozen nearly identical two-story 
store-and-flats buildings in the 4600 block, built in 1911 by architect Ira 
Saxe for Bidderman. All have the same plan and a modicum of variety is 
achieved by varying the brick trim. The usual storefront alterations are 
probably reversible in most cases. See Photo 14. 



Condition , intrusions 

The exterior and interior condition of the building stock Is highly 
variable, ranging from abandoned shells to prize-winning rehabilitations. 
As mentioned above, perhaps half of the frame houses have been resided with 
inappropriate materials, usually asphalt or asbestos siding. Some porches 
have been enclosed and some roofs replaced. Such changes are common enough 
everywhere, and Sheridan Park cannot claim exceptional integrity for Its 
frame houses as a group. There are nevertheless a large number of 
significant houses in very good condition or even pristine (4642 Magnolia, 
Photo 2). Naturally the brick houses are less affected; the worst that has 
happened to them is loss of a tile roof, or enclosure of an open porch. 

The postwar housing shortage had a terrific impact on the district. 
Houses became rooming houses, two-flats became five- or eleven-flats, 
six-flats were converted to 13-, 16-, or 19-flats, or into rooming houses. 
This was often done improperly with respect to the building code, and many 
of these conversions were not structural. The Impact on the exteriors of 
buildings is primarily the introduction of fire escapes and auxiliary 
entrances. Although in some cases the historic fronts have been damaged, in 
many other cases the exterior is hardly affected. A visitor could hardly 
guess which six-flats had been converted to rooming houses without going 
Inside; two very good examples are at 4606 Dover and 4710 Magnolia. 

Since most of the district's buildings are stone and brick, and since 
only a handful of these buildings have been sandblasted, the face of most of 
the buildings has not changed much over the years. Careless tuckpointing 
may represent a future threat but has not been a widespread problem to date. 

Cornices are a problem everywhere. In Sheridan Park a number of cornices 
are well maintained, while many others have been lost. On the typical 
six-flat the "cornice" consists nf a decorative course, which may be stone, 



received 
date entered 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service T " "** "• ** 

National Register of Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form 

Continuation *«* Sheridan Park Historic „ em numbef 7, Description p^ 

y-\ r ^n ■ »y "■- — — — 



brick, terra cotta, wood, or sheet metal, and which usually lies a little 
way below the top of the wall. The sheet metal ones are particularly 
susceptible to corrosion and loss. Various ways of patching the affected 
area, more or less unsuccessful, can be seen at various places. However, 
many buildings retain their original decorative cornices in good condition; 
cf. Photo 8. 

The advent of enclosed sun parlors after 1910 led to the enclosing of 
formerly open porches on a number of apartments . This has been done with 
varying degrees of insensitivity, but usually little permanent damage has 
been done to the fabric of the building. See Photo 11. 

Some buildings have had their windows changed, usually replacement of the 
sash by simpler or more energy— efficient units . Only a small number of 
buildings have been thus affected. 

Blight has taken a toll in the neighborhood, and its impact is felt 
primarily in the presence of vacant land, representing the loss of part of 
the historic fabric. About eight per cent of the land in the district is 
vacant. Aside from eight vacant lots on the 4600 block of Maiden (one a 
city playlot) , most of the vacant land is in the southeast quadrant of the 
district, near Truman College. 

Fifteen buildings have been listed as intrusive. The one really 
intrusive new building is, ironically enough, the Hull House Uptown Center, 
built in the name of Jane Addams to meet what someone thought was a need to 
bring the arts to the area. Down the block there is a large postwar nursing 
home. Across the street is one of a group of seven postwar apartment 
buildings in which all the apartments are entered from outside balconies, as 
in a motel. These are all on Beacon or Dover, on the standard fifty-foot 
lots. The Chicago Housing Authority has built two six-flats on Magnolia, 
and has announced plans for several more nearby. 

There are two churches, small and ungainly postwar brick buildings; and 
there is a "schome" or parent-child center, built around 1970 as an adjunct 
to Stockton School, but some distance away. Finally there is a boating 
equipment store on Montrose (a traffic artery leading to a yacht harbor). 
The new configuration of this building is amusing enough but would be more 
appropriate in a less historic setting. 

Tt could be argued that none of these fifteen buildings are really 
intrusive. None are higher than the prevailing three stories, most are 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service Fw Nps UM "^ 



National Register of Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form 



received 
date entered 



Continuation sheet Sheridan Park Historic itemnumber 7, Description Page 
Diot r i et - 



built of brick, and all are set back from the sidewalk, though not always to 

the historic building line. Tt is a persuasive indication of the integrity 

of Sheridan Park that these are the most intrusive buildings in the 
district. 



The district has strong natural boundaries north and south, as it lies 
between two cemeteries. 

On the west, Clark Street forms a natural boundary. Properties at 
4411-49, 4501-43, and 4715-47 N. Clark are excluded because they are 
primarily non-residential and have no over-riding architectural or 
historical interest. The building at the rear of 4711 N. Clark is included 
because it has a historical tie: it was the office of A. W. Engel who built 
and resided in the apartments at 4700 N. Dover and 1458 W. Leland. The 
other properties on the east side of Clark Street are store-and-flat 
buildings which are generally of the scale and character of the district. 

The Issel Building at the southwest corner of Clark and Wilson is a 
3-story store-and-flat building of exceptional architectural interest, and 
the Issel family lived on Dover Street, so it is included as an exception to 
the west line. 

On the east, the elevated tracks and the Broadway commercial strip form a 
boundary, but commercial buildings on Wilson and recent buildings have been 
excluded following the principle that the general character is residential. 
The Broadway strip has many outstanding buildings (Uptown and Riviera 
theaters, Uptown National Bank, to name three), but its character is so 
different that it seems appropriate to leave aside that area for another 
district. On that basis the commercial buildings on Wilson near Clifton are 
drawn out of the district, since they form a part of the Broadway strip 
historically and architecturally. 

The nursing home at 4621-29 N. Racine is excluded; it was built in the 
twenties as a hotel but has been destructively altered. At the northwest 
corner of Racine and Wilson the modern fire station is excluded, and 
likewise the store building at the southeast corner of Wilson and Magnolia. 
These buildings are non-residential and are out of character. Truman 
College is excluded as too new and out of character. 

At 4401 Clifton there is a very fine fidlson substation which anchors the 
corner of the district. The buildings just west, at 1122-40 W. Montrose, 
are commercial and could be left out, but were included for simplicity. 



OMB NO. 1014 -0018 
NPS Forni 10-WO-i Em- iO-3i-3« 

United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service ■*,*»«.•* 

National Register of Historic Places .«• •«- 
Inventory— Nomination Form centered 

Continuation sheet Sheridan Park H. D. Item number 7 ^9f 8a 



Criteria for contributing Structures 

Those buildings regarded as contributing to the Sheridan Park 
historic district meet a number of criteria. They were built 
during the period of significance, i.e., 1391-1929. Theyalso 
retain enough integrity of exterior appearance from the time of 
construction or from alterations during the period of 
significance to provide a positive contribution to the district. 
The major criteria used were use, scale, massing, materials, 
fenestration, and ornamental details, with respect to setting, 
design, and workmanship. Such exterior alterations as 
application of inappropriate siding, change of roof materials, 
storefront alterations and addition of signs, window alterations 
within the original openings, and addition of fire escapes are 
regarded as reversible or minor, and do not prevent listing a 
structure as contributing if the other criteria of significance 
are met. 

Accordingly two structures are listed as non-contributing, which 
date from the historic period: a one-story store and a one-story 
garage, both of which have been substantially altered. 

All structures built after the period of significance have been 
listed as intrusive; each of them violates not only the date but 
some of the other criceria for contributing structures. 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form 



-For NW ym «Hfy 
:*nWSth>ed' ' 



Continuation sheet 



Sheridan Park Historic 
D i aU 'i iL 



7, Description 



Page 



ARCHITECTURAL SIGNIFICANCE 



4451-59 Beacon 1914 
Architect : D.S.Pentecost 
Corner apts for John Flaherty 
Photo No. 9 

4530-32 Beacon 1913 
Architect: Hall & Westerlund 
2-flat for John E. Ericsson 



4653-57 Beacon 1909 

Architect unknown 

Corner apts for Charles Lindell 

4721-25 Beacon 1910 
Architect : Wm. A. Bennett 
Twin 3-flats for Evan Larson 
Photo No. 11 (extreme left) 



3. 4535 Beacon 1900 
Architect unknown 
Residence for John S. Hummer 
Photo No. 3 

4. 4556-60 Beacon 1905 
Architect : S.N.Crowen 

Corner apts for Chas . Congleton 
IHSS (*) , CCHAL 

5. 4611-13 Beacon 1902 
Architect : S.N.Crowen 
6-flat for Fred Britton 
Photo No. 8 

6. 4621-23 Beacon 1904 
Architect: Wm.G.Krieg 
6-flat for Ernst Williams 

7. 4627 Beacon 1892 
Architect unknown 
Residence for Benj . B. Jones 

8. 4636 Beacon 1904 
Architect: Edmund Krause 
Residence for Andrew Lanquist 
IHSS (*) 

Photo No. 5 

9. 4646 Beacon 1904 
Architect: Edmund Krause 
Residence for Ernest Heldman 



4729-31 Beacon 1903 
Architect: Niels Buck 
6-flat for Fred Schroeder 

4740-42 Beacon 1897 
Architect : F.W.Thomsen 
Residence for Oscar Kuehne 
Photo No. 1 Cleft) 

4750-52 Beacon 1896 
Architect unknown 
Residence for John R. Stack 
Photo No. 1 (right) 

4401-03 Clark 1908 

Architect: W.H.Walter 

Store & flats for Peter Coorlas 

4405-09 Clark 1927 
Architect : Steinbach & Lampe 
Store & flats for P.E.Cocklan 

4532-56 Clark 1929 
Architect: Johnson & Johnson 
Store & flats for Issel 

4401-13 Clifton 1916 
Architect: Van Hoist & Fyfe 
Substation for Com. Edison 
IHSS, CCHAL 



United States Department off the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form 



For NPfl «*• «Jj 



Continuation sheet 



Sheridan Park Historic 



Item number 7, Description Page 10 



19. 4453-59 Dover 1905 
Architect : Geo.S.Kingsley 
Corner apts for C.H. Thompson 

20. 4540 Dover 1901 
Architect: J. Gamble Rogers 
Residence for Sam Brown Jr 

21. 4600-04 Dover 1906 
Architect : D.S.Pentecost 
Corner apts for Jas.T. Gardner 

22. 4606-08 Dover 1904 
Architect: Hugo J. Liedberg 
6-flat for Selma Hoist 

23. 4618-20 Dover 1898 
Architect unknown 

Frame 2-flat for G.C. Marsh 
IHSS 

24. 4629 Dover 1912 
Architect unknown 
2-flat 

25. 4640 Dover 1901 
Architect: J. Gamble Rogers 
Residence for Sam Brown Jr 

26. 4641-43 Dover 1903 
Architect : E.E.Roberts 
2-flat for R.A.Sanborn 
IHSS (*), CCKAL 

Photo No . 6 

27. 4644 Dover 1904 
Architect: J. Gamble Rogers 
Residence for Sam Brown Jr 

28. 4649-51 Dover 1905 
Architect: Nils Hallstrom 
Corner apts for Nils Erickson 



29. 4652 Dover . 1901 
Architect: J. Gamble Rogers 
Residence for Sam Brown Jr 

30. 4700-06 Dover 1924 
Architect : Wra. Bernhard 
3-flat for Albert W. Engel 

31. 4707 Dover 1908 
Architect: E.E.Roberts 
2-flat for Peter Sjoholm 
IHSS (*) , CCHAL 

32. 4712-14 Dover 1901 
Architect: J. Gamble Rogers 
Residence for Sam Brown Jr 
Photo No. 4 

33. 4730 Dover 1909 
Architect: Wm. A. Bennett 
2-flat for Michele Stangarone 



4741-43 Dover 
Architect : Rogers? 
Residence for Bryar 



1900 
Lathrop 



1201-13 Leland 1926 
Architect: Dubin & Eisenberg 
Hotel for Eisenstein & Smith 
Photo No. 13 

1430 Leland 1898 

Architect unknown 

Residence for M. O'Shaughnessy 

1456-58 Leland 1913 
Architect: Julius H. Ruber 
3-flat for Albert W. Engel 

4500-02 Magnolia 1908 
Architect: David Robertson 
Corner apts for Thomas H. Kendall 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form 



For N0» ma «*f 



Continuation sheet 



Sheridan Park Historic 
Die bin ut 



Item number 7 > Description p^ 



39. 4626 Magnolia 1925 46. 
Architect: Hyland & Corse 

Hotel for Paul V. Hyland 

1HSS (*) , CCHAL 

Photo No. 12 47. 

40. 4636 Magnolia 1904 
Architect : Wm. G.Krieg 

Residence for Nober Gottlieb 48. 

41. 4642 Magnolia 1896 
Architect : Wm.G.Weigle 
Residence for Wm.G.Weigle 

IHSS (*), CCHAL 49. 

Photo No. 2 

42. 4646 Magnolia 1924 

Architect: Paul Hansen 50. 

Half-courtyard apts for P. Hansen 

43. 4720-24 Magnolia 1893 

Architect unknown 51. 

Residence for C.H.Beyer 
IHSS, CCHAL 

44. 4747 Magnolia 1902 

Architect: Nils Hallstrom 52. 
3-flat for Minnie Hettle 

45. 4521-23 Maiden 1928 
Architect: N.T.Ronneberg 
Apt hotel for Geo. F.Johnson 
National Register 1983 



4546 Maiden. 1894 
Architect: R.C.Berlin 
Residence for R.C.Berlin 

4601-03 Maiden 1908 
Architect: Charles Thiaslew 
Corner apts for Herman Fitch 

4602 Maiden 1895 
Architect: R.C.Berlin 
Residence for W.J.Clark 
IHSS (*), CCHAL 

4645-47 Maiden 1904 
Architect: Wm. G.Krieg 
6-flat for Martin C. Anderson 

4654-56 Maiden 1902 
Architect : H.H. Waterman 
Corner apts for Geo.L.Lavery 

4736 Maiden 1925 
Architect : Raymond Gregori 
Apt hotel for Raymond Gregori 
IHSS (*), CCHAL 

1412-14 Montrose 1908 
Architect: W.M.Walter 
6-flat for Peter Coorlas 



HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE 



4700-04 Beacon 1906 
Architect: Edward A. Hogenson 
Conner apts for Cheater Thordarson 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form 



FgrNPtviMOlr 



datt«MM*d 



Continuation sheet Sheridan Park His toric 
DuL l ilL 



Item number 7, Description 



List of intrusive and non-contributing buildings 
in Sheridan Park district 



Intrusive buildings (All are apparently post-1941) 



Beacon 


4520 




19? 


2-story 


Beacon 


4534- 


42 


19? 


3-story 


Beacon 


4541 




19? 


3-story 


Beacon 


4612- 


14 


19? 


3-story 


Beacon 


4616 




19? 


3-story 


Dover 


4537 




19? 


3-story 


Dover 


4543 




19? 


3-story 


Dover 


4547 




19? 


3-story 


Dover 


4610 




19? 


3-story 


Dover 


4755- 


57 


196 


1-story 


Magnolia 


4425- 


29 


19? 


1-story 


Magnolia 


4446- 


50 


19? 


3-story 


Magnolia 


4700 




19? 


3-story 


Maiden 


4716 




19? 


1-story 


Montrose 


1122 




19? 


2-story 



Hull House community center 

nursing home 

"mot el"- type housing 

"motel "-type housing 

"motel"-type housing 

"motel "-type housing 

"motel"-type housing 

"motel" -type housing 

"motel"-type housing 

church 

school 

CHA 6-flat 

CHA 6-flat 

church 

store (1985 remodeling) 



Non-contributing buildings 



Montrosf 



1138 1915 

1418-22 1913 



1-story garage 

1-story store (remodeled later) 



NP3 Forni 10-300-1 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form 



jForNPStHW«nOf 



Continuation sheet Sheridan Park Historic 



Item number 7, Description 



All buildings are regarded as contributing 
unless otherwise indicated. 



the character of the district, 



Number Date Classificn. 



Number Date Classificn. 



Beacon 


4400-38 


1924 




Beacon 


4621-23 


1904 Significant 


Beacon 


4401-03 


1915 




Beacon 


4627 


1892 Significant 


Beacon 


4407-09 


1915 




Beacon 


4630-32 


1926 


Beacon 


4411-15 


1915 




Beacon 


4636 


1904 Significant 


Beacon 


4417-19 


1915 




Beacon 


4639-41 


1909 


Beacon 


4421-23 


1915 




Beacon 


4645 


1904 


Beacon 


4427-29 


1915 




Beacon 


4646 


1904 Significant 


Beacon 


4435-37 


1914 




Beacon 


4649 


1899 


Beacon 


4440-48 


1914 




Beacon 


4650-56 


1913 


Beacon 


4441-43 


1915 




Beacon 


4653-57 


1909 Significant 


Beacon 


4447-49 


1915 




Beacon 


4700-04 


1906 Histor.signif 


Beacon 


4451-59 


1914 


Significant 


Beacon 


4701-03 


1926 


Beacon 


4452-58 


1913 




Beacon 


4706-08 


1924 


Beacon 


4501-03 


1915 




Beacon 


4707-09 


1910 


Beacon 


4506-08 


1911 




Beacon 


4713-15 


1909 


Beacon 


4507 


1910 




Beacon 


4716-24 


1922 


Beacon 


4509 


1908 




Beacon 


4717-19 


1909? 


Beacon 


4510-12 


1903 




Beacon 


4721-25 


1910 Significant 


Beacon 


4515 


1908 




Beacon 


4726-34 


1922 


Beacon 


4517 


1908 




Beacon 


4729-31 


1903 Significant 


Beacon 


4520 


19?? 


Intrusive 


Beacon 


4735 


1927 


Beacon 


4521 


1892 




Beacon 


4736-38 


1916 


Beacon 


4525 


1900 




Beacon 


4740-42 


1897 Significant 


Beacon 


4530-32 


1913 


Significant 


Beacon 


4741-43 


1904 


Beacon 


4531 


1897 




Beacon 


4745-47 


1914 


Beacon 


4534-42 


19?? 


Intrusive 


Beacon 


4748 


1898 


Beacon 


4535 


1900 


Significant 


Beacon 


4749-51 


1916 


Beacon 


4541 


19?? 


Intrusive 


Beacon 


4750-52 


1896 Significant 


Beacon 


4545-47 


1929 




Beacon 


4753-55 


1916 


Beacon 


4551 


1910 




Beacon 


4754 


1895 


Beacon 


4556-60 


1905 


Significant 


Clark 


4401-03 


1908 Significant 


Beacon 


4600-08 


1924 




Clark 


4405-09 


1927 Significant 


Beacon 


4601-09 


1901 




Clark 


4451-55 


1909 


Beacon 


4611-13 


1902 


Significant 


Clark 


4532-56 


1929 Significant 


Beacon 


4612-14 


19?? 


Intrusive 


Clark 


4545-47 


19?? 


Beacon 


4615-17 


1905 




Clark 


4551 


1906 


Beacon 


4616 


19?? 


Intrusive 


Clark 


4553 


1903 



OMB Ho 10M-C 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form 



FoMPSu. 

'iwelved 



Continuation sheet Sheridan Park Historic 



Item number 7. Description page 14 



UlbH'ICt 



Clark 


4555- 


59 


1898 


Dover 


4453- 


59 


1905 


Significant 


Clark 


4601 




1898 


Dover 


4500- 


02 


1897 




Clark 


4605- 


07 


1905 


Dover 


4501- 


03 


1913 




Clark 


4611- 


13 


1926 


Dover 


4506 




1904 




Clark 


4615 




1905 


Dover 


4507- 


09 


1910 




Clark 


4617 




1928 


Dover 


4511- 


13 


1908 




Clark 


4619- 


21 


1909 


Dover 


4512 




1910 




Clark 


4623 




1911 


Dover 


4516 




1908 




Clark 


4625 




1911 


Dover 


4517 




1898 




Clark 


4627 




1911 


Dover 


4520 




1901 




Clark 


4631 




1911 


Dover 


4521- 


23 


1904 




Clark 


4633 




1911 


Dover 


4522 




1907 




Clark 


4635 




1911 


Dover 


4525- 


27 


1908 




Clark 


4637 




1911 


Dover 


4526 




1901' 




Clark 


4641 




1911 


Dover 


4530 




1904 




Clark 


4643 




1911 


Dover 


4531 




1907 




Clark 


4645 




1911 


Dover 


4533 




1910 




Clark 


4647 




1911 


Dover 


4534 




1901 




Clark 


4651 




1911 


Dover 


4536 




1904 




Clark 


4653 




1911 


Dover 


4537 




19?? 


Intrusive 


Clark 


4655- 


57 


1923 


Dover 


4540 




1901 


Significant 


Clark 


4711 




1920 


Dover 


4542 




1904 




Clark 


4751- 


59 


1916 


Dover 


4543 




19?? 


Intrusive 


Clifton 


4401- 


13 


1916 Significant 


Dover 


4547 




19?? 


Intrusive 


Clifton 


4416- 


24 


1912 


Dover 


4548 




1905 




Clifton 


4428- 


32 


1909 


Dover 


4552 




1900' 




Clifton 


4431- 


41 


1909 


Dover 


4556- 


58 


1916 




Clifton 


4434- 


36 


1908 


Dover 


4600- 


04 


1906 


Significant 


Dover 


4400 




1904 


Dover 


4601- 


17 


1914 




Dover 


4404 




1904 


Dover 


4606- 


08 


1904 


Significant 


Dover 


4406 




1904 


Dover 


4610 




19?? 


Intrusive 


Dover 


4410 




1904 


Dover 


4616 




1896 




Dover 


4412 




1908 


Dover 


4618- 


20 


1898 


Significant 


Dover 


4416 




1908 


Dover 


4619- 


21 


1913 




Dover 


4420 




1908 


Dover 


4625 




1912 




Dover 


4422 


24 


1907 


Dover 


4626- 


28 


1905 




Dover 


4428- 


34 


1905 


Dover 


4629 




1912 


Significant 


Dover 


4438 




1905 


Dover 


4630 




1904 




Dover 


4440- 


42 


1905 


Dover 


4633 




1910 




Dover 


4444- 


46 


1903 


Dover 


4634 




1903 




Dover 


4448- 


50 


1905 


Dover 


4636 




1904 




Dover 


4452- 


54 


1905 


Dover 


4637 




1911 





United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form 



Continuation shot Sheridan Park H istoric 
Dim III 



Itemnumber 7, Description 



ICgcHPSuMMly 



Page 15 



Dover 


4640 


1901 


Significant 


Leland 


1457-59 


1901 




Dover 


4641-43 


1903 


Significant 


Leland 


1462-64 


1902 




Dover 


4644 


1904 


Significant 


Magnolia 


4400-08 


1912 




Dover 


4646 


1905 




Magnolia 


4411-13 


1914 




Dover 


4647 


1898 




Magnolia 


4414-22 


1912 




Dover 


4649-51 


1905 


Significant 


Magnolia 


4417-19 


1912 




Dover 


4652 


1901 


Significant 


Magnolia 


4424-28 


1912 




Dover 


4654-56 


1905 




Magnolia 


4425-29 


19?? 


Intrusive 


Dover 


4700-06 


1924 


Significant 


Magnolia 


4430-32 


1912 




Dover 


4707 


1908 


Significant 


Magnolia 


4442-44 


1912 




Dover 


4708 


1910 




Magnolia 


4445-47 


1911 




Dover 


4711-13 


1906 




Magnolia 


4446-50 


19?? 


Intrusive 


Dover 


4712-14 


1901 


Significant 


Magnolia 


4451-57 


1911 




Dover 


4715-19 


1912 




Magnolia 


4500-02 


1908 


Significant 


Dover 


4716 


1908 




Magnolia 


4501-03 


1905 




Dover 


4720 


1908 




Magnolia 


4506-08 


1909 




Dover 


4721-23 


1898 




Magnolia 


4507-09 


1909 




Dover 


4722 


1908 




Magnolia 


4510-12 


1904 




Dover 


4725-27 


1910 




Magnolia 


4516-18 


1905 




Dover 


4726 


1909 




Magnolia 


4517-19 


1909 




Dover 


4729 


1910 




Magnolia 


4520-22 


1901 




Dover 


4730 


1909 


Significant 


Magnolia 


4521-25 


1909 




Dover 


4731 


1910 




Magnolia 


4526-28 


1905 




Dover 


4734 


1910 




Magnolia 


4531-33 


1908 




Dover 


4735 


1915 




Magnolia 


4535-37 


1909 




Dover 


4736 


1909 




Magnolia 


4536-38 


1927 




Dover 


4737 


1911 




Magnolia 


4540-42 


1927 




Dover 


4738 


1912 




Magnolia 


4541-43 


1908 




Dover 


4741-43 


1900 


Significant 


Magnolia 


4604-10 


1894 




Dover 


4742 


1913 




Magnolia 


4607 


1898 




Dover 


4745 


1912 




Magnolia 


4609-11 


1903 




Dover 


4746-48 


1913 




Magnolia 


4612 


1899 




Dover 


4749 


1913 




Magnolia 


4614-16 


1912 




Dover 


4749 


1917 




Magnolia 


4615-17 


1908 




Dover 


4750-52 


1915 




Magnolia 


4620-22 


1902 




Dover 


4755-57 


1967 


Intrusive 


Magnolia 


4621-23 


1908 




Dover 


4756-58 


1916 




Magnolia 


4626 


1925 


Significant 


Leland 


1141-49 


1904 




Magnolia 


4627 


1909 




Leland 


1201-13 


1926 


Significant 


Magnolia 


4633-35 


1909 




Leland 


1420-26 


1915 




Magnolia 


4636 


1904 


Significant 


Leland 


1430 


1898 


Significant 


Magnolia 


4642 


1896 


Significant 


Leland 


1456-58 


1913 


Significant 


Magnolia 


4645-47 


1906 





United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form 



If9l NPS «•• OH*J 



Continuation sheet Sheridan Par k Historic 
Ui at i n iet 



Item number 7, Description Page 16 



Magnolia 


4646 


1924 Significant 


Maiden 


4521-23 


1928 


Significant 


Magnolia 


4652 


1892 


Maiden 


4525-27 


1908 




Magnolia 


4654-56 


1913 


Maiden 


4529 


1915 




Magnolia 


4700 


19?? Intrusive 


Maiden 


4536-38 


1916 




Magnolia 


4701-03 


1907 


Maiden 


4542 


1900 




Magnolia 


4707 


1892 


Maiden 


4546 


1894 


Significant 


Magnolia 


4710-12 


1902 


Maiden 


4547-49 


1896 




Magnolia 


4711 


1909 


Maiden 


4550 


1923 




Magnolia 


4715 


1909 


Maiden 


4554-56 


1917 




Magnolia 


4716 


1914 


Maiden 


4555 


1915 




Magnolia 


4719 


1909 


Maiden 


4601-03 


1908 


Significant 


Magnolia 


4720-24 


1893 Significant 


Maiden 


4602 


1895 


Significant 


Magnolia 


4723 


1909 


Maiden 


4607-09 


1906 




Magnolia 


4726-30 


1905 


Maiden 


4613 


1902 




Magnolia 


4727-29 


1907 


Maiden 


4615 


1927 




Magnolia 


4731 


1910 


Maiden 


4621-23 


1901 




Magnolia 


4734-38 


1913 


Maiden 


4625-27 


1904 




Magnolia 


4735 


1900 


Maiden 


4629-31 


1904 




Magnolia 


4741-43 


1911 


Maiden 


4635-37 


1904 




Magnolia 


4742-44 


1909 


Maiden 


4636-38 


1904 




Magnolia 


4746-50 


1909 


Maiden 


4641-43 


1914 




Magnolia 


4747 


1902 Significant 


Maiden 


4642 


1916 




Magnolia 


4749-57 


1909 


Maiden 


4645-47 


1904 


Significant 


Maiden 


4400-04 


1915 


Maiden 


4649-51 


1916 




Maiden 


4401-09 


1915 


Maiden 


4654-56 


1902 


Significant 


Maiden 


4408-10 


1915 


Maiden 


4655-57 


1905 




Maiden 


4413-15 


1913 


Maiden 


4700-02 


1910 




Maiden 


4414-18 


1915 


Maiden 


4701-03 


1910 




Maiden 


4417-21 


1913 


Maiden 


4706 


1896 




Maiden 


4420-22 


1914 


Maiden 


4707 


1925 




Maiden 


4426-28 


1914 


Maiden 


4711 


1908 




Maiden 


4430-32 


1913 


Maiden 


4712 


1902 




Maiden 


4436-40 


1914 


Maiden 


4715-17 


1923 




Maiden 


4442-46 


1914 


Maiden 


4716 


19?? 


Intrusive 


Maiden 


4441-43 


1912 


Maiden 


4721 


1909 




Maiden 


4447-49 


1912 


Maiden 


4722 


1915 




Maiden 


4448-56 


1913 


Maiden 


4727 


1927 




Maiden 


4451-57 


1912 


Maiden 


4728 


1892 




Maiden 


4500-12 


1925 


Maiden 


4730-32 


1905 




Maiden 


4501-19 


1924 


Maiden 


4731-33 


1914 




Maiden 


4516 


1911 


Maiden 


4735-37 


1926 




Maiden 


4520-28 


1925 


Maiden 


4736 


1925 


Significant 



NPS fonn 10-»00-» 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form 



, FwNPS HM sidy 



Continuation sheet 



Sheridan ParkHistoric 
Diat i' iet 



Itemnumber 7, Description 



Maiden 


4740-42 


1911 




Racine 


4432-34 


1916 




Maiden 


4741 


1913 




Racine 


4616-18 


1909 




Maiden 


4744 


1911 




Racine 


4620-24 


1909 




Maiden 


4745-47 


1914 




Racine 


4626-28 


1909 




Maiden 


4746 


1911 




Racine 


4631-37 


1904 




Maiden 


4750-52 


1914 




Racine 


4632-40 


1911 




Maiden 


4751-53 


1912 




Racine 


4641 


1909 




Maiden 


4754-60 


1917 




Racine 


4644-46 


1911 




Maiden 


4755-57 


1904 




Racine 


4645 


1909 




Montrose 


1122 


19?? 


Intrusive 


Racine 


4700-04 


1910 




Montrose 


1138 


1915 


Non-contrib. 


Racine 


4706-18 


1909 




Montrose 


1412-14 


1908 


Significant 


Racine 


4720-32 


1909 




Racine 


4400-08 


1915 




Sunnyside 


1410-12 


1927 




Racine 


4401-07 


1915 




Sunnyside 


1417 


1908 




Racine 


4409-11 


1908 




Sunnyside 


1419 


1909 




Racine 


4410-12 


1915 




Sunnyside 


1423 


1909 




Racine 


4415-17 


1908 




Wilson 


1218-30 


1920 




Racine 


4416-18 


1912 




Wilson 


1317-27 


1928 




Racine 


4419-21 


1908 




Wilson 


1359-67 


1927 




Racine 


4422-24 


1911 




Wilson 


1410-14 


1900 




Racine 


4426-28 


1911 




Wilson 


1418-22 


1913 Non 


-contrib 


Racine 


4431-33 


1904 













This nomination contains 351- contributing buildings and 17 recontributing buildings. 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form 



Fw NPt um 91*1 






Continuation sheet 



Sheridan Park Historic 



Item number 7 * Description p^ 



LEGEND: Elacked-in: Architecturally significant 
Double hatched: Historically significant 




'— ~H s oca 'il 
L_ nr J;,i ^ a 



^K : ^mT>^s-jlQM 



^tsa 



9 9S28S 



r3C3tT"i: 









zSSt^tsiJ 







United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 



A Fpf HP! HMOrtr 

National Register of Historic Places %£8&' ' 
Inventory — Nomination Form 



Continuation sheet 



Sheridan Park Historic 



Item number ?> Description page 19 



LEGEND: Double hatched: Intrusive 

Single hatched: Noncontributing 
Asteri sk : Detnol ished 




United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service p« nw *• «** 

National Register of Historic Places ""*"" 
Inventory— Nomination Form ****** 

Continuation sheet Sheridan Park Histor ic: Item number 7, n^r-YMpHnn Pa9e ?r 

District 

List of photographs. 

All photos were taken by Dennis Pratt in 1985. 

1. Three residences, 4742, 4748, 4752 Beacon (1897,1898,1896) 
Streetscape, looking southwest 

2. Residence, 4642 Magnolia (1896) 
View, looking northwest 

3. Three residences, 4535, 4531, 4525 Beacon (1900,1897,1900) 
Streetscape, looking southeast 

4. Residence, 4712 Dover (1901) 
View, looking west 

5. Two residences, 4636, 4646 Beacon (both 1904) 
Streetscape, looking northwest 

6. Two-flat, 4641 Dover (1903) 
View, looking east 

7. Row of two-flats, 4716-26 Dover (all 1908 or 1909) 
Streetscape, looking northwest 

8. Six-flat, 44.11-13 Beacon (1902) 
View, looking east 

9. Corner apartment, 4451-59 Beacon (1914) 
View, looking southeast 

10. Row of six-flats, W side 4400 block of Maiden (all 1913-1915) 
Streetscape, looking northwest 

11. Row of six-flats, E side 4700 block of Beacon (all 1909-1910) 
Streetscape, looking northeast 

12. Hotel, 4626 Magnolia (1925) 
View, looking west 

13. Hotel, 1207 Leland (1926) 
View, looking southwest 

14. Row of store & flat buildings, li side 4600 block of Clark (all 1911) 
Streetscape, looking northeast 



8. Significance 



Period Areas of Significance — Check and justify below 

prehistoric — . archeology- prehistoric X community plannini 

1400-1499 _ archeology-historic conservation 

1 500-1 599 agriculture _ economics 

_ .. 1600-1699 X architecture education 

1700-1799 art engineering 

..A_ 1800-1899 commerce 

JL.. 1900- communications 



landscape architecture 
_ law 

literature 
. military 



religion 
_ science 
sculpture 

.. social/ 
humanitarian 



exploration settlement . philosophy 

Industry politics government 

invention 



_ transportation 
_ other {specify) 



Specific dales 1391-1929 Builder Architect See Section 7 

Statement of Significance (in one paragraph) 

Sum mary 

Sheridan Park is a district of large homes, six-flats, larger apartment buildings, and 
hotels, built between 1891 and 1929. Its primary significance is architectural. 
Successive waves of suburban and then urban residential development left different 
traces on the land, but in spite of the change in density of population, the physical 
scale of the neighborhood, both horizontal and vertical, remained almost constant 
throughout the historic period. This is due in large part to the situation on gently 
rising ground, the thoughtful layout of the streets, the wide lawns mandated by building 
lines, and the uniform 50-foot frontage of the original lots; and so community planning 
has also played a significant role. This is a predominantly middle-class area and its 
architects are primarily local in importance, so that the existence on every block of 
buildings of exceptional merit testifies to the level of achievement of American architects, 
builders and tradesman of the period. The district is almost entirely free from modern 
intrusions; less than five per cent of its buildings have been built in the last 50 years, 
none are higher than three stories. The district meets criteria for the National Register: 
It embodies the distinctive characteristics of a type or period, the large middle-class 
suburban house of the turn of the century, the Chicago six-flat of the period 1897-1916, 
and the Chicago common-corridor building of the 1920's. And the successive phases of build- 
ing are a vivid record of the broad patterns of the history of residental growth in a 
large American city. 



United States Department of the Interior ^„~™_.„ — „_„ 

National Park Service F <* NPS u «""* 

National Register of Historic Places ™«^ d 

Inventory — Nomination Form dateent««t 

Continuation sheet Sheridan Park H. D. Item number 8 P 8 ^ 



Significance : community planning 

The community- planning significance of Sheridan Park is briefly 
mentioned in the Summary paragraph of Item 8. 

Several paragraphs in Item 7, Description, under the heading 
"Situation, orientation, building lines, scale," address this 
aspect of the significance of the district. Several paragraphs 
in Item 8, Significance, under the heading "Origins and history," 
discuss the latent effects of the planning of the original 
subdivision under 0. C. Simonds. Throughout the discussion of 
the district in Items 7 and 3, frequent mention is made of the 
effect of the 50-foot scale of the building lots, and the spatial 
effects of the setbacks mandated by the original building lines. 

For these reasons, it is felt that the form as submitted 
substantiates the claim for significance in community planning, 
rf the Staff or che Council does not agree, time does not permit 
rewriting of the form before the deadline given, and in this case 
the check-off for planning significance should be dropped in the 
heading to Item 8. 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service ** NP » «• •* 

National Register of Historic Places *«•*- 
Inventory— Nomination Form .*»«i«* 

Continuation sheet Sheridan Park Historic ite mnumber 8, Significance Page 2 
UilL i 1 lL " — ~ ' 



Ori gins and history 

The North Side of Chicago is geologically an old lake bottom, which 
explains its exceptional flatness. Two sandy spits stand out, albeit only 
slightly, on this surface. Their names - Rosehill Spit and Graceland Spit - 
recall the names of two historic cemeteries that chose this well-drained, 
sandy, relatively high terrain for burial grounds. 

Graceland Cemetery was chartered in 1860, when the surrounding part of 
the town of Lake View was still rural. After the subdivision of Ravenswood 
was settled a little to the north and west, beginning around 1870, tension 
developed between townspeople and the cemetery over the land which it was 
holding for future use, north of the cemetery itself. This is the land that 
became Sheridan Park. 

Because of the well-drained site and the subtle but pleasing elevation, 
the land was desirable for development, and would have been built on sooner 
had it not been held by the cemetery. In 1889, it was proposed by Frederick 
Law Olmsted as an attractive core site for the World's Columbian Exposition, 
a suggestion which was dropped in favor of the now famous south-side site. 

Finally, in April 1891, Graceland Cemetery Corporation subdivided the 
maior part of the land in question and put it on the market. It was called 
the Sheridan Drive Subdivision, named after the much ballyhooed drive, now 
called Sheridan Road, that real-estate promoters were using to advertise 
lakefront property from Chicago to the far northern suburbs. The Sheridan 
Drive subdivision was bounded essentially by what would now be called 
Lawrence Avenue, Racine Avenue, Sunnyside Avenue, and Clark Street. 

East-west streets were continuations of existing Lake View thoroughfares 
and took the same names. But the north-south streets were limited by 
Graceland on the south and by St. Boniface Cemetery on the north. They were 
given names derived from Boston streets or places: Pemberton, Arlington, 
Maiden, Beacon, and Dover. 

These streets depart from the Chicago grid in a subtle but Important 
manner. Clark Street is a prehistoric trail. It follows the sandy ridge 
(i.e., Graceland Spit) in a direction somewhat west of true north. Thus the, 
subdivision is wider at Lawrence (on the north) than at Sunnyside (on the 
south). Ossian Cole Simonds , the famous landscape architect who was 
superintendent of the grounds at Graceland Cemetery, was in charge of 
planning and landscaping the subdivision. He took up the extra width little 
by little, so that all the streets bend slightly to the west, more as une 
moves north and west toward Lawrence and Clark. When street numbers and 
street names in Chicago were "rationalized" in 1909, the two eastern 
streets, Pemberton and Arlington, were renamed as part of Racine and 



NPS fotm KHOO-l 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service fwmph 

National Register of Historic Places «•"■"•* 
Inventory — Nomination Form d 

Continuation sheet Sheridan Park Historic item n umber 8 » Significance 
D i iLi 111 -^_— — ^^-^_ 



Magnolia Avenues. But Maiden, Beacon, and Dover Streets, which deviate more 
conspicuously from the grid of the city, kept their separate names and 
identities. 

Notching can be said to remain of Simonds' landscaping, but the 
neighborhood retains several features from his influence. The street names 
are distinctive. The bending or curving of the streets and sidewalks is 
very unusual in Chicago. As slight as this curvature may be, it has the 
important effect of closing off the vistas to the north and south, enhancing 
the feeling of place. The high masonry walls enclosing the two cemeteries 
north and south of the area naturally add to this sense of closure. 

The subtle but noticeable rise in the land, corresponding to the ancient 
lake shore, like the bending of the streets, helps to soften the flat 
rectangularity which is typical of most of Chicago. 

Finally, building lines were recorded in the original plat (and in the 
subsequent subdivisions of the remaining nearby land) which stipulated 
setbacks of at least 30 feet on all the north-south streets (except Clark). 
Where the lots are deepest, at the northern end of Beacon and Dover, the 
building line is a full fifty feet. This further enhances the special and 
suburban feeling of place. 

A suburban railroad station was built in 1891, called Sheridan Park by 
analogy with nearby stations at Buena Park and Argyle Park, and this name 
became the popular name of the neighborhood. 

Sam Brown, Jr., a prominent real-estate man, was put in charge of selling 
the lots and promoting the area, while Bryan Lathrop, a leading capitalist, 
prominent civic leader (a founder and president of the Chicago Symphony), 
and an officer of Graceland Cemetery, financed the lot sales by taking trust 
deeds personally. 

Between 1891 and 1897 over one-third of the 354 lots in the original 
subdivision were sold, and about 70 buildings were erected. Except for a 
handful of two- and three-flats, these were all single-family residences. 

In January 1898, the Economist, in an article about lot sales on the 
North Shore, referred to "Sheridan Park, Winnetka, Wilmette and other 
suburbs." This list is amusing today because the future history of Sheridan 
Park was to take an entirely different course from that of those "other 
suburbs ." 

As the city of Chicago (which had annexed the town of Lake View in 1889) 
grew out to this area and beyond, and as commuter transportation improved 
with the arrival of the elevated at Wilson Avenue in 1897, a second stage of 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service |B>r^ w«|«jr 

National Register of Historic Places ^'^ 
Inventory — Nomination Form < 

.8, Significance 

ram niimrvr ' -' 



development began. The fifty-foot lots which were so suitable for suburban 
houses were also admirably suited for small apartments buildings, and 
especially for six-flats. 

A Chicago six-flat is a three-story walk-up apartment building, usually 
symmetrical, with a center entrance and stairway giving access to two 
apartments or flats on each floor. Fifty to sixty feet is the ideal width 
of building lot for such a structure. 

Corner lots were subject to more intensive development. Two or three 
six-flats could be shoe-horned into a 50x150 corner lot, and this happened 
at the same time as the six-flat development. Courtyard apartments, 
requiring assembly of two or more lots, began in 1909 and never became an 
important part of the neighborhood. 

In the years around World War I, a remarkable commercial boom took place 
in the area just east of Sheridan Park, which became known as "Uptown," 
renamed its principal thoroughfare "Broadway," and tried to become the 
terminus for the Twentieth Century Limited trains from New York. Wilson 
Avenue had been an entertainment center from the beginning, with beaches, 
theaters and night clubs. Construction of large hotels, such as the 
12-story Sheridan Plaza at Sheridan and Wilson (1920; National Register 
1980), huge entertainment centers (Uptown Theatre, 1925, with about 4000 
seats; Aragon Ballroom), and even large office buildings (Sheridan Bank at 
Lawrence and Broadway, raised to 12 stories in 1927), displayed the 
operation of economic forces that had an inevitable impact on nearby 
residential streets. Intense pressure on land values, continuing through 
most of the decade after the war, brought about another phase of 
development. 

By 1929, Sheridan Park was mature: only three or four lots were vacant, 
and a score of hotels and kitchenette apartment buildings had been built 
there. Many of them were built on sites of the early houses. In fact the 
earliest and largest houses were likeliest to fall. They had obsolete 
plumbing and wiring and were intended for families with live-in servants. 
Changes in lifestyle saw apartment hotels for single people replacing these 
old houses. On Broadway and on Wilson, restaurants, night clubs, theaters, 
and all forms of shops and entertainment catered to this population. 
Transportation was a key asset: Wilson and Broadway was a major interchange 
and terminus for local and long-line railways and for local and express 
busses. 

After World War II, a housing shortage took its toll in Sheridan Park, as 
spacious old homes and apartments were converted into rooming houses. The 
resulting crowding became a blighting factor, especially when the automobile 
displaced public transportation in American lifestyles. An apartment hotel 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service ForHWuMwiHr 

National Register of Historic Places •***« 
Inventory — Nomination Form dm**™* 

Sheridan Park Historic itemnumber 8 > Significance page 



might have 75 rooms and no parking places; until 1945, it thrived, but later 
it could no longer attract prosperous tenants. Like much of Uptown, 
Sheridan Park became a port of entry for immigrants from rural areas of the 
U.S. and from other countries. 

Today, the area exhibits a remarkable mix of population, economically, 
socially, and culturally. The effect on the historic fabric is also mixed: 
historic rehabilitation goes forward on the same streets and at the same 
time as decay and abandonment. Perhaps recognition of the historic 
character of the built environment of the area can serve to stimulate 
retention of more of the housing stock for all classes of residents, while 
preserving for the future the buildings and the story they tell of 
successive waves of development in a favored city neighborhood. 

Houses , two-flats , three-flats 

In the first decade, 1891-1901, about a hundred buildings were built in 
Sheridan Park. Ninety percent were single-family residences or two-flats. 
(Most of the rest were six-flats and corner apartments, the first of which 
appeared in 1897.) Thus the neighborhood had an essentially suburban 
character. This was enhanced by the fact that most of the houses were 
architect-designed and one of a kind. 

The fifty-foot lots encouraged large detached residences, and the area 
was outside the city's fire limits. Some stone and brick houses were built, 
but the majority were frame. Although not numerous, the survivors impart 
much of the character of the district, because of the impact of their size 
and their picturesque designs. 

The oldest house standing is apparently the frame house at 4627 Beacon, 
built in 1892, in the free Victorian manner, using shingles and clapboard, 
projecting and overhanging bays, and odd features like the stubby columns at 
the entry. The large frame house at Maiden and Wilson, designed by R. C. 
Berlin in 1895, is a well maintained Victorian with a picturesque variety of 
gables and dormers, part Queen Anne, part Colonial, all eclectic. At 4642 
Magnolia, architect William Weigle built for himself a very interesting 
house, in which the transverse gambrel roof swoops down from the third-floor 
peak, past two steep dormers, to envelop the front porch (Photo 2). This 
house has been in the same family since the turn of the century and is 
pristine inside and out. A group of three 1890s frame houses may be seen at 
4748-54 Beacon Street (Photo 1). 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service F«NP»w««ni» 

National Register of Historic Places ■«** 
Inventory — Nomination Form *»«*«« 

Continuation sheet Sheridan Park Historic Item number 8, Significance Page 6 

™" ui strict 

At 4618-20 Dover Street what might be taken for a single-family house is 
actually a two-flat, from 1898. It is unusual for its generous two-story 
verandah. Governor John P. Altgeld and his family lived in this house for 
about a year, around 1901. They then bought a house on Maiden which was his 
last residence, and where his widow lived on until the teens. That house is 
unfortunately demolished, as is the house where Mayor and later Governor 
Edward Dunne lived from about 1908 to 1916. 

A very fine Victorian stonefront will be found at 4724 Magnolia, with 
beveled and leaded windows and a slender pointed corner tower. 

Among the brick Victorians, there is the house built in 1894 by Berlin 
for his own residence at 4544 Maiden, which has some stylistic features in 
common with the above-mentioned house at Maiden and Wilson. The house next 
door at 4542 dates from 1900. A very distinctive brick house from 1897 was 
designed at 4742 Beacon by F. W. Thomsen, a Southern architect imported by 
the original client, who wanted a Southern-style house. This may account 
for its uniqueness. At any rate it is the only house in the neighborhood 
with decorative carpentry around the front, and it has among other features 
a little upstairs porch off the boudoir. (See Photo 1, left.) 

These houses and many others have interiors with outstanding hardwood 
trim, fireplaces, built-in sideboards and window benches, and other quality 
features distinguishing the upper middle-class home of the turn of the 
century from what is built today. 

The 1904 house by William Krieg at 4636 Magnolia has the most interesting 
planning of these early houses. A prominent stair hall with a fireplace and 
elaborate woodwork serves as the focus for a complex intersection of spaces , 
multiplied by built-in mirrors, and leading to a dining-room fireplace 
completely surrounded by art-glass windows, seeming to have no flue. 

Also in 1904 two large brick houses were designed by Edmund Krause at 
4636 and 4646 Beacon. See Photo 5. These have rectangular massing very 
different from the earlier Victorians, and relating to the line of the 
modern movement that is epitomized by the Madlener House on State Parkway 
(National Register 1970). The two-story house at 4636 was built for Andrew 
Lanquist , a leading builder, first as partner with Henry Ericsson and later 
as head of his own firm. Krause, well known for his early apartment 
buildings and for the Majestic Building (Shubert Theatre) at 22 West Monroe 
in the Loop, here surrounds the windows on the front with rectangular stone 
frames , but on the side he carries a stone course some distance below the 
eaves and above the windows, while the windows themselves are left untrimmed 
and severe. The brick is a medium or light brown with a reddish tinge. 
Next door at 4646 the three-story orange brick house is also very 
rectangular, with wide eaves, and framed front windows. Its most striking 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service ;ff Np » «•• •"* 

National Register of Historic Places «*« 
Inventory — Nomination Form ,*»«■"■« 

Continuation sheet Sheridan Park Historic Item number 8, Significance Page 7 

U i btr l r t ~~ 

feature is a long wrought-iron third-floor balcony, supported by large 
scrolled brackets. Behind the balcony is a row of six windows, separated by 
engaged octagonal columns (which are also used in the porch at 4636) , and 
recalling the ballroom windows of the Madlener House. 

Lot sales in the subdivision slumped in 1896-1900, and in 1901 Sam Brown, 
Jr., took a step that would have far-reaching implications for Dover Street. 
He resubdivided several lots on the 4500 and 4600 blocks, and commissioned a 
number of houses by architect James Gamble Rogers. Rogers, born in 
Kentucky, schooled in Chicago and then at Yale, began a practice in Chicago 
in the early 1890s and built one 12-story office building, then left to 
study at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris. On his return he gained rapidly 
in renown. He designed the large house on State Parkway which in later life 
became the "Playboy Mansion," and would shortly design the Blaine School of 
Education at the University of Chicago. In 1904 he would move to the East 
where he would eventually become known as the finest American Gothicist ; he 
is famous for the Harkness Quadrangle at Yale, and he designed much of the 
historic fabric of both the Evanston and Chicago campuses of Northwestern 
University. 

Here on Dover Street, Rogers used a mix of stucco and half-timber 
surfaces, boulder porches and chimneys, steep gables, and small-paned 
windows with diagonal muntins to create a medievalist atmosphere. Whether 
the eight houses listed on the original building permit were all built 
according to Rogers' plans is not entirely clear. The putative Rogers 
houses in the 4500 block are not so characteristic, especially as some of 
them have been disguised by inappropriate siding . Also , it is interesting 
to note the house at 4741-43 Dover, built by an unidentified architect - 
possibly Rogers - for Bryan Lathrop, Sam Brown's distinguished collaborator, 
in 1900. Whether this house was designed by Rogers or not, it was probably 
the progenitor of the whole group. 

These houses are not only attractive in themselves, but had a lasting 
impact on the development of Dover Street, both in scale and in style. The 
33-foot scale was set down on much of Dover Street by these operations. 
Moreover, the medievalist flavor was picked up as much as twenty years later 
by other architects, especially on the east side of the 4600 block. Note 
especially 4629-31, with its stone trim in Gothic style and its English 
windows . 

Another important current in American architecture, the Prairie School, 
left its mark on Dover street a little later. In 1903 E. E. Roberts of Oak 
Park designed the two-flat at 4641-43 Dover for the Sanborn and Freeborn 
families. This two-tlat has considerable intrinsic interest. The entry is 
dramatized by a low-pitched pyramidal roof with wide overhanging eaves and 
distinctive supporting columns. The house sits flat on the ground, without 



MPS fonn 10-900-t 
p-«l 

United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form **«m«a 

Continuation sheet Sheridan Park Historic Ke mnumbef 8, Significance Pay 8 
D i si i I II 

a basement , and a brick wall rises from the base to the sill line of the 
second-story windows. The second story is extremely shallow and is finished 
in stick and stucco. Above it loom the wide overhanging eaves of a low- 
pitched roof. Most of these aspects are representative of the Prairie 
School style in its mature phase. 

The massing Is also very Interesting. On the left, the entry projects 
forward from a recessed block. In the center, living-room bays provide a 
reference point. To the right, an enclosed first-floor porch projects 
boldly beyond the rest of the front elevation, but above, there is only a 
deck, and thus the main block recedes again. 

All this would be Interesting enough in a building from the heyday of the 
Prairie School In 1910 or 1912, but this two-flat was designed and built in 
1903-1904. With the admittedly capital exception of Frank Lloyd Wright's 
Willits house in Highland Park a year earlier, there is very little 
characteristic Prairie School work this early to compare with Roberts' very 
finished work here. Thus this two-flat is not only of intrinsic interest 
but seems to be a previously unnoticed landmark in the evolution of the 
Prairie School. 

Roberts did another two-flat on Dover, at 4707, about five years later, 
but it Is much less distinctive. Tall, slender art-glass windows and two- 
story square columns at the entrance are the most interesting features. 

In this connection there is also a two-flat at 4731 Magnolia which Is 
apparently very much influenced by 4641 Dover, though it is much less 
distinctive. It was designed in 1910 by David Mctiaffy. 

The large house at 4535 Beacon has a brick-veneered first floor and a 
stick-and-stucco upper floor, like the Prairie examples, but its high gables 
give it an English flavor. Built in 1900 by an unidentified architect for a 
high-ranking judge, it may be related to the Gamble Rogers group. (Photo 3). 

Many of the two-flats on the west side of the 4700 block of Dover were 
designed by William Arthur Bennett. Some hardly rise above the vernacular 
(see Photo 7), but at 4730 Bennett gives full play to his feeling for the 
decorative possibilities of contrasting colors of face brick, with a very 
attractive result . 

Note Bennett's twin three-flats at 4721-25 Beacon (1910). Some of the 
large six-flats have central light courts open to the rear, e.g., 4635 
Maiden (1904). Here Bennett brings the light court all the way through, and 
the two sides are joined only at the common entry porch. He also uses a 
two-tone brick treatment much like that at 4730 Dover. 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service ForNWut-Mi* 

National Register of Historic Places ****** 
Inventory — Nomination Form **•*«* 

Continuation sheet Sheridan Park Historic (temnumber 8, Significance Page9 

Dull ill — 

Examples of two-flats in an earlier style are found in the 4400 block of 
Dover, which was subdivided in 1904, at which time Niels Buck built the four 
at 4600-4610; he was architect, builder, and client. Later he built three 
more at 4412-20 for Frederick Schroeder. 

The exceptionally large (35x100) two-flat at 4630 Beacon was not built 
until 1913, showing the continuing demand for luxury housing even after the 
small-scale development on Dover. Designed by Hall & Westerlund, it reveals 
its late date by the extensive use of terra cotta. 

One other aspect of the houses and two-flats is of interest. It is often 
difficult to distinguish the single- from the two-family residences. This 
may be considered an attempt to disguise the two-flats or to give them the 
aspect of single homes. This would accord with the thinking of those like 
C. W. Westfall who have discussed the reluctance of Chicagoans , in contrast 
to New Yorkers or Parisians, to live in flats. Indeed it is not clear at 
first glance that the stonefront at 4610 Magnolia is a one while that at 
4547 Maiden Is a two. The verandah house at 4618-20 Dover turns out to be a 
two, as does the Roberts masterpiece at 4641-43 Dover. 

There are not so many three-flats in Sheridan Park - about 22, and most 
of them are without special distinction. However, a few are unusual. At 
4747 Magnolia Nils Hallstrom designed a very large three-flat in 1902 which 
is set on the north side of the lot to leave a spacious side yard, and which 
has large wooden rear porches overlooking the yard, a feature quite rare in 
Chicago, and very indicative of the suburban quality of the area as late as 
1902. Across the street at 4630 is an enormous stone three-flat of 1905 
with a rather grand stone porch in front, which unfortunately has had 
structural problems . 

A most unusual plan distinguishes the three-flat at 4700 Dover, designed 
for Albert Engel in 1924 by Wilhelm Bernhard. Engel was an Inventor and 
entrepreneur, whose factory across the alley on Clark Street manufactured 
"Engel 's Art Corners," the adhesive bits used to fasten photographs into 
scrapbooks . He first lived in a house at the corner, then built the 
apartment in the rear (1913, architect Julius Huber , who moved into one of 
those apartments in the Depression) , and finally razed the house and built 
this three-flat. The two upper flats are very large and very wide, allowing 
freedom in plan quite rare in this neighborhood. A small flat shares the 
first floor with the usual basement facilities and also with one of 
Chicago's earliest and handsomest attached automobile garages. 



OMB Ho 1034-0018 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service ' 

National Register of Historic Places r 
Inventory — Nomination Form c 

Continuation sheet Sheridan Park Historic Item nu mber 8, Significance Page 10 

[ iiunci 

Six-flats 



There are over 100 six-flats in Sheridan Park (and dozens of others were 
demolished in the land clearance for Truman College). These are the most 
typical buildings in the neighborhood in many respects. They were built 
from 1897 to 1916 and tracing their evolution gives insight into the various 
phases of the architecture and the psychology of apartment living in 
Chicago. 

The earliest ones are sometimes faced in brick but often in stone. They 

are three-story buildings with a center entrance giving access to a central 

stairway (often beautifully finished) leading to one apartment on each side 
of each floor. 

It is very common to see these buildings with projecting bays, round at 
first and usually trapezoidal later, representing the front parlors of each 
flat. Following the thinking that Chicago flats in the early days tried to 
look like mansions, we can point to very likely prototypes in Chicago's Gold 
Coast district (National Register 1978). At 120 East Bellevue, Bryan 
Lathrop's house had this form: a three-story dwelling with round bays at 
each end of a facade which is symmetrical except for the entry. It is buiit 
in red brick in a Georgian manner. Designed by McKim, Mead, and White for 
the man who was financing the subdivision land purchases, this is one 
obvious source - and a prestigious one - of the standard six-flat design. 

An even more exact prototype is found in the William Kerfoot house at 
1425 Astor Street. Also a symmetrical front with round bays, three stories 
high, but finished in grey limestone, this house is even closer in materials 
and scale to the early Sheridan Park six-flats. 

It is not particularly fruitful to assign stylistic categories to these 
early six-flats with their standardized massing. Architectural details were 
stamped out in one fashion or another, often Georgian or classical in 
inspiration. The greatest energy is evident in the treatment of the 
entrances. Only visual Inspection can convey the variety of entry 
treatments, including arches, segmental arches, pediments, broken pediments, 
sinuous shapes, posts and lintels of every description, globes, urns, or 
bulls-eyes. 

Through about 1908, balconies or porches, if any, are open, and usually 
related to the central entrance. About 1908, a new current begins to 
declare itself. In that year a six-flat at 4637 Magnolia by Leon Stanhope 
(no longer extant) had an entire front layer of balconies, under tile roofs 
and supported by brick piers which made the open porches seem almost to be 
voids In the building rather than projections. Built the same year, a 
corner 12-flat at 4500 Magnolia by David Robertson also has open balconies 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service fm np» mm only 

National Register of Historic Places n ^^ i 
Inventory — Nomination Form ,w,wlM,i 

Continuation sheet Sheridan Park Historic item number 8, Significance Page 11 

Di t itnot ■ — '■— 



across the three-story front. Here the facade is dominated by two-story 
high round stave-built wood columns. 

Late in 1908 porches begin to appear frankly as voids within the building 
mass; see 4507-09 or 4511-13 Dover, or 4507-09 Magnolia (all by different 
architects) . 

Perhaps the city was becoming too crowded or too noisy for open porches. 
In any event, the next phase is the enclosed sun parlor. This mode of 
apartment arrived on the Chicago scene at a very timely moment in the 
history of Sheridan Park, for it was in 1910-1912 that the land between 
Graceland Cemetery and Sunnyside Avenue was subdivided and developed. In a 
matter of months these blocks filled up with row after row of six-flats with 
three-story tiers of totally enclosed sun parlors, where a decade earlier 
there had been only the round or octagonal swellings of the masonry fronts. 
The homogeneity of these blocks is striking. In some cases several six- 
flats were built on one permit, as for example the five buildings at 4407-29 
Beacon. In other cases several developers and several architects were 
involved, but the style is so dominant that only minor differences are seen 
along the street. 

At 4707-55 Beacon there are 10 buildings built for ten different clients 
by at least seven different architects, ranging in date from 1903 to 1916. 
Several were built in 1909-1910 just before the sun parlor craze. Photo 11 
shows how the porches have been remodeled (not very elegantly) to adapt to 
the new mode. The newest building in this block is the apartment hotel at 
4735, built in 1927, but in feeling it is surprisingly close to the oldest 
six-flat on the block next door at 4729-31. This is an excellent example of 
how the visual scale and character of the neighborhood are preserved through 
the passing decades and the changes in architectural styles and lifestyles. 

Larger apartments : corners , courtyards 

What has been said for the six-flats is generally true for the larger 
apartment buildings. This includes about 30 corner buildings and about 15 
courtyard buildings . 

The corner buildings may be regarded as six-flats in front and threeor 
six-flats on the side, and the same stylistic evolution is seen in them as 
in the six-flats. Several very handsome corner buildings exhibit the round 
bays of the early years: 4601 Beacon (1901), which predates the six-flats 
at 4607-4623; 4656 Maiden (1902), a rare four-story example; 4453-59 Dover, 
with its mannerist entry columns (1905); 4649 Dover (1905), and others. 



NPS *flmi 10*»« OMB No 

04» El P »- 

United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service .h»np»™«ii» 

National Register of Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form 

Conization sheet SheHdan Park Historic | te mnumber 8 - Significance p^ 12 

The corner building at 4700 Beacon, built in 1906, has historical 
significance. It was built for Chester Thordarson, the great electrical 
engineer, born in Iceland in 1856, who bought Rock Island in Wisconsin and 
developed it as a magnificent country retreat. This apartment building has 
one tier of very large apartments, and presumably one of those was where the 
Thordarson family lived from 1906 until the mid-1920s. Here is a vivid 
example of "city house, country house"! 

Charles Thisslew designed the "Evelyn" at Wilson and Maiden (1908), which 
combines large round bays with overhanging roof and stucco third floor to 
produce an interesting and unusual effect. (The brick porches were added in 
1912, an unfortunate early reaction to the porch craze.) Another remarkable 
qv --of-a-kind corner building is 4556 Beacon, designed in 1905 by Samuel 
North Crowen, and giving free rein to his flair for unusual details with a 
vaguely Art Nouveau quality. This building has a dramatic terra-cotta 
cornice projecting three feet from the wall, which was poorly maintained In 
the past and presents a difficult restoration challenge. 

At 4451-59 Beacon the large corner building is a distinctive example of 
the corner building as multiple six-flats. The terra-cotta ornament is 
colorful and playful without being obtrusive. The architect was D. S. 
Pentecost and the year 1914. This building won the highest award for 
quality rehabilitation at Chicago's City House exposition a few years ago; 
its hardwood floors and trim, built-in hutches and other Interior features 
are as beautifully preserved or restored as its brick and terra cotta 
exterior. 

About fifteen courtyard apartment buildings are scattered around the 
district. They date from 1909 (four examples on Clifton and Racine) to 1925 
(4520-28 Maiden) and they are not an especially interesting aspect of the 
fabric of the district. Chicago's most distinctive courtyard buildings, 
like the Pattington (National Register 1980), were built on much larger land 
assemblies than were generally possible in Sheridan Park. 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service ^rm nnim** 

National Register of Historic Places «^« d 
Inventory — Nomination Form .*»•*•«*, 

Continuation sheet Sheridan Park Historic itemnumber 8, Significance page 13 
District — — 

Hotels and kitchenette apartment buildings 



As mentioned in the historical sketch, the last phase of the urban 
evolution of Sheridan Park was the construction of a score of large 
buildings with small units. These buildings are often referred to as 
"common-corridor" buildings because they consist of a large number of hotel 
rooms or small apartments accessed from a common corridor, as opposed to 
Chicago's traditional six-flats, corners, and courtyards where only one or 
two apartments per floor are reached from each entry. 

The zoning code of 1923 evidently gave an impetus toward the construction 
of a. certain typical common -corridor building, which would cover a 50-foot 
lot from front to back, with three floors of dwelling units over a high 
"English basement" containing common rooms and service facilities. A dozen 
mid-block buildings in the district fit this description perfectly. While 
some are given a minimum of architectural thought, others are very 
attractive. The economics permitted special attention to the front, since 
so many rental units were squeezed in behind, usually with the plainest of 
common-brick vernacular sides and rear. Some of these facades are almost 
like six-flats (4706 Beacon), while others are quite frankly something 
different. Medieval flavoring (4550 Beacon, 4735 Beacon) is seen, and the 
so-called Spanish Baroque appears, at 4736 Maiden or 4521 Maiden for example 
(the latter building is National Register 1983). 

At 4626 Magnolia (Photo 12) a most curious facade by Hyland & Corse 
(1925) departs from the internal symmetry of the plan to create a kind of 
Gothic fantasy in white cement tile. 

Finally larger hotels came to the most profitable locations. The most 
attractive is the Leland Hotel (Photo 13) with its so-called Spanish style 
characterized by twisted columns and a frothy parapet. 



Materials and details 



In January 1897, the Brickbuilder complained that "it is a melancholy and 
somewhat humiliating fact that under existing conditions the quality of 
brickwork is - all things considered - probably worse in America than in any 
other civilized country." For various reasons the picture changed radically 
over the next few years. The use of Roman brick by Stanford White and 
others in the Gold Coast, and by Frank Lloyd Wright and the Prairie School, 
and the use of tapestry brick by Louis Sullivan in the Felsenthal Store 
(1907) and his small-town banks, created an entirely new market. The 
Economist, in its review of 1910, stated: "The feature of the year's market 
has been the growth in popularity of brick with a rough surface like velvet 
or bark. The artistic qualities of these brick are indicated by such names 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form .****«« 

Continuation sheet Sheridan Park Historic item number 8, Significance Page 14 

D l iU i ll ~ 

as Oriental, Tapestry, Astrakhan, Mission, Texture, Matt, Bokhara, Velour , 
Antique, and Rugosa." 

There is very little Roman brick In Sheridan Park, but a variety of 
colors is used early. The rows of brick six-flats on the 4600 blocks of 
Magnolia and Beacon, which date between 1901 and 1909, show a palette 
ranging from tan and orange through purple and dark brown. 

High-fired face brick with a speckled appearance (caused by the oxidation 
of mineral impurities) can be found already in such 1905 buildings as 4448 
Dover (by William Nicholson) or 4556 Beacon (by Samuel Crowen) . 

The rapid expansion of the market for tapestry or textured brick around 
1910 came just in time for the sudden development of the area south of 
Sunnyside with rows of brick sun-parlor six-flats. Although the brand names 
have not been identified, the variety is evident to the eye. The 
predominant color is dark red, but changes in color are often used to 
mitigate the monotony when two or more buildings are built to the same plans 
(4400 block of Maiden, for example). The brick texture may be speckled, 
striated, or even cross-hatched (the two-flat at 4722 Maiden is a fine 
example from 1915). 

We have mentioned W. A. Bennett's use of contrasting pale colors at 4730 
Dover and at 4721-25 Beacon. The common practice of using contrasting 
colors of bricks for entries, corner quoins, or cornices, or sometimes for 
the entire first floor, will be observed in many places. Sometimes no color 
contrast is used, and the effect depends solely on the projection of the 
decorative bricks from the flat wall surface. 

The brick 9-flat at 4653-57 Beacon is an interesting proto-modern 
building (1909, architect unidentified). The brick has a pale blond or sand 
color with speckling. The lines are severely rectangular and there is 
virtually no ornament. However, the top eight brick courses of the facade 
are corbeled out in a curve to meet the projection of the roof. 

The most interesting use of stone in the district is for doorway trim. 
What was said before about doorways need not be repeated here. However, 
surely the street-number medallions at 4621-23 Beacon (William Krieg, 1905, 
showing the pre-1909 numbers) are among the most unusual in Chicago. 

The extraordinary use of terra cotta in the Broadway district does not 
spill over into the residential streets very much. However, there are good 
examples at 4459, 4530, and 4735 Beacon, and at 4550 Maiden. The Spanish 
style of the 1920s used terra cotta lavishly. The Maiden Towers (4521 
Maiden, National Register 1983) is an outstanding example. See also the 
Leland Hotel (Photo 13), the Coronado (4736 Maiden), and the store building 



MPS Form 10-M0-1 °** B •*> "»*-0 

(WD E,p w - 3, - M 

United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service ^Nr nw ■» »* 

National Register of Historic Places ***** 
Inventory — Nomination Form (■«••*«« 

Continuation sheet Sheridan Park Historic item number 8, Significance page 15 

L nttPi ot — — ' '■ - ■ - 

at Wilson & Dover. One should also note the three store-and-flats buildings 
on Clark Street (4401, 4405, 4556) for their use of this versatile material. 

Architects , developers , and architect -developers 

Sheridan Park was not built by famous architects (except James Gamble 
Rogers), nor was it built by vernacular builders. Architects have been 
identified for three-fourths of the buildings, but their names are usually 
at the level familiar only to experts on Chicago neighborhoods. It will 
have been noticed that many of the architecturally significant buildings are 
by such men as Nils Hallstrom, David Robertson, and N. T. Ronneberg, who are 
almost unknown. Thus Sheridan Park stands as testimony to the generally 
high level of design skill and building trades in this period in Chicago. 

A house by Adler & Sullivan, another by Hoiabird & Roche, and a railway 
station by Frank Lloyd Wright have all disappeared long ago. The big 
downtown architects are not represented here, with due respect for Edmund 
Kxause and Samuel Crowen. The Prairie School is here only through E. E. 
Roberts, who is not even mentioned in the index to Brooks' standard 
reference book on that movement. 

Leading apartment architects, such as Andrew Sandegren and John Nyden, 
are represented, but their work here does not stand out from the generally 
high quality of the surrounding buildings. 

Robert Carl Berlin, who did two fine houses on Maiden, lived in the 
neighborhood at the time. He is known as the architect for the YMCA in 
Chicago and for the Wieboldt Stores. William Krieg, City Architect 1907-09 
and then the founder of Midland Terra Cotta, is represented by an 
outstanding house and three high-quality six-flats. Raymond Gregori is the 
master of the common-corridor building, and built three very different ones 
at 4545 Beacon, 4735 Beacon, and 4736 Maiden. Edward Benson was the 
architect for the largest number of extant buildings, sixteen, but they are 
not of special merit. 

Sam Brown, Jr., must be regarded as the most important developer in the 

area, because he built many of the first houses to get the subdivision 

started, and then commissioned Gamble Rogers to set the tone on Dover 
Street. 

William H. Barry was the developer of the area east of Racine, where he 
had yi six-flats built between 1903 and 1915. Largely because of the land 
clearance for Truman College, only one known building remains of Barry's, 
the six-flat at 4526-28 Magnolia. William Pickel was the major developer 
south of Sunnyside in 1910-1915, where his architects were Thomas Bishop and 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service F* npi hm amy 

National Register of Historic Places *«•*«■ 

Inventory — Nomination Form c 



Continuation sheet Sheridan Park Historic item number 8, Significance Page 16 

DUL i ill 



Charles Hoermann. He built in Che area as early as 1903 (4510 Beacon) and 
as late as 1925 (4528 Maiden). His buildings range from a single-family 
house (4551 Beacon, 1910) to large courtyards, but most. of the 25 or so 
still extant are six-flats. 

A number of architects built for theselves as clients in Sheridan Park, 
not just for investment but for residence as well. Two of the fine early 
houses were built by Robert C. Berlin and William Weigle for their own 
homes. Other architects built apartment buildings for themselves as 
investments: Albert Hecht , Victor Rombault, William Nicholson, John Hulla, 
and Raymond Gregori (the hotel at 4736 Maiden). 

This is strikingly exemplified on the 4600 block of Magnolia. The 
distinctive house at 4642 is Weigle's from 1896. The eight-flat at 4620 was 
designed by William Klewer for himself in 1902. The half-courtyard 
Rembrandt at 4646 was built by Paul Hansen for himself in 1924, and the 
unique hotel at 4626 by Paul Hyland for himself in 1925. Thus four out of 
five buildings in this row were designed with that special attention which 
an architect can be expected to give to his own property. 

Niels Buck appears in Sheridan Park as architect, builder, and client, 
over a quarter of a century, though never on a major scale. He participates 
in each phase of the development of the neighborhood. In 1896 he buys the 
lot at 4607 Magnolia; the following year he sells it to C. L. Ibson for whom 
he builds a fine Victorian house (still standing but sided). In 1903 he 
builds a fine stonefront six-flat at 4729-31 Beacon, with a big entry arch. 
In 1904, when Dover is opened south of Sunnyside , he builds four two-flats, 
on his own land. In 1908 he builds a brick six-flat on Magnolia and four 
more two-flats on Dover. After designing two more two-flats in 1912 and 
1913 he does not appear again until 1923, when, in the spirit of the times, 
he designs a common-corridor apartment hotel at 4550 Maiden, In a 
medievalizing style and looking rather like a six-flat. 

The excellent documentation available on Sheridan Park, with architects 
known for most of the buildings and dates for nearly all, makes it possible 
to trace not only general trends in Chicago neighborhood building, but also 
to follow specific instances like the case of Niels Buck, and to answer such 
questions as how many different architects and developers shared in the 
construction of this interesting piece of the historic city. 



Urfited States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form 

Continuation sheet rM^rir'f Park Hl " 5ton ' c Itemnumber 8, Significance 



Comparison with other districts 

Sheridan Park may reasonably be compared with several other large mixed 
urban districts in Chicago, such as Hyde-Park-Kenwood, Lakeview, Sheffield, 
and especially Buena Park. 

What sets Sheridan Park aside is its late starting date of 1891, its 
well-defined boundaries, its planning (street layout and building lines, and 
the gentle slope of the land) , its homogeneity of scale through several 
generations of development, and above all its freedom from modern 
intrusions . 

Sheffield (National Register 1976) Is a much older area, largely built up 
before 1900. It is built to a small scale, with 25-foot lots and with 
narrower streets and smaller setbacks. Standing within the city fire 
limits, it has few if any significant wood residences. 

Lakeview (National Register 1977) began early and most of its single- 
family residences are in rows rather than detached. The scale is very 
heterogeneous, with 25-foot frontages mixed in among very large and very 
high apartment projects. Again there are no large wood residences. 

Hyde Park and Kenwood (National Register 1979) form a large and somewhat 
disparate area, also rather heterogeneous in scale. The mansions of Kenwood 
stand on very large lots and the streets dominated by these mansions have 
little in common physically with the tightly built up streets of apartments 
and small houses near the University. In Hyde Park there has also been 
considerable urban renewal, resulting in some large modern apartments and 
some tiny modern houses. 

Buena Park (National Register 1984) is near to Sheridan Park (they meet 
almost corner to corner) and there is considerable overlap in some respects, 
for instance, the generation of sun-parlor apartments in tapestry brick. 
Buena began earlier, and has changed more in recent years. The scale again 
is not so homogeneous; the mansions of Hutchinson Street, which in some 
respects form the backbone of Buena Park, are difficult to relate to the 
fine apartments nearby. Buena, like most lakefront neighborhoods, has also 
suffered numerous recent high-rise intrusions, of which Sheridan Park has 
none. Finally, the commercial artery, Broadway, cuts through the middle of 
the Buena district and again disrupts the scale and the feeling of place. 
Although Wilson Avenue cuts through the middle of Sheridan Park, its 
buildings are from the historic period and generally in the historic scale. 
The 12-story Norman Hotel, while towering over Wilson Avenue, is no larger 
in plan than the other apartments in the area, and its materials and style 
belong to the historic period; most importantly, it is the only high 
building in Sheridan Park, 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service . Nr nw »•• «*. 

National Register of Historic Places ™*™* 
Inventory — Nomination Form <*t»*Ttorw* 

Continuation sheet Sheridan Park Historic Item number 8, Significance Page 18 
D i iU ill — 

Ease and west of Sheridan Park are two areas that merit inclusion on the 
National Register. On the west of Clark Street one enters gradually into 
Ravenswood , an area with similar types of buildings to Sheridan Park. 
Ravenswood began in 1869 and has many suburban frame houses of interest. 
Later it saw various stages of apartment development, including common- 
corridor buildings. Much of it was built on the 50-foot scale, with wide 
setbacks. However, Ravenswood lacks closure. The streets belong to the 
Chicago grid and the land is flat. Instead of being bounded by cemeteries, 
Ravenswood tails off indeterminately in all directions, and the part nearest 
to Sheridan Park is separated from the rest by two sets of elevated railway 
tracks and an industrial corridor. 

East of Sheridan Park, the Broadway commercial strip abounds in fine 
terra-cotta buildings, including many of Chicago's best examples of the Art 
Deco style, and punctuated by a number of nationally significant structures 
such as the Uptown National Bank, the Uptown Theater, and the Aragon 
Ballroom. This district merits recognition, but its character is completely 
different from the residential character of Sheridan Park. 



United States Department of the Interior - - 

National Park Service f«>.nps ..««.* 

National Register of Historic Places .«*«« 
Inventory— Nomination Form *i.«m«d 

Continuation sheet Sheridan Park H.D. Item number j j. Pag 9 2 



Verbal boundary description ( Item 10 ) : 
The boundary of the Sheridan Park district may be described thus: 

Beginning at the intersection of the south line of Lawrence Avenue 

with the east line of Clark Street; 
Thence in a southerly direction along the east line of Clark 

Street to the south property line o£ 4751-59 Clark Street; 
Thence in an easterly direction along said south property line of 

4751-59 Clark Street to the center line of the alley between 

Clark and Dover Streets; 
Thence in a southerly direction along center line of said alley to 

its intersection with the north property line of 4711 Clark Street; 
Thence in a westerly direction along said north property line of 

4711 Clark Street to the intersection with the east line of 

Clark Street; 
Thence in a southerly direction along said east line of Clark 

Street to its intersection with the south l.ine of Wilson Avenue; 
Thence west along said south line of Wilson Avenue to the 

intersection with the east line of the alley between Clark 

Street and Greenview Avenue; 
Thence south along the east line of said alley to the south 

property line of 4532-58 Clark Street; 
Thence in an easterly direction along said south property line of 

4532-58 Clark Street to its intersection with the center line of 

Clark Street; 
Thence in a northerly direction along said center line of Clark 

Street to its intersection with the south property line of 4545 

Clark Street; 
Thence in an easterly direction along said south property line of 

4545 Clark Street to the center line of the alley between Clark 

and Dover Streets; 
Thence in a southerly direction along center line of said alley to 

its intersection with the south line of Sunnyside Avenue; 
Thence west along said south line of Sunnyside Avenue to its 

intersection with the east line of Clark Street; 
Thence in a southerly direction along said east line of Clark 

Street to the intersection with the south property line of 4451 

Clark Street; 
Thence in an easterly direction along the south property lines of 

4451 Clark Street and 1423, 1419, and 1417 Sunnyside Avenue to 

the center line of the alley between Clark and Dover Streets; 



United States Department of the Interior -,^ ~ — 

National Park Service f^nps «•:<** 

received 



National Register of Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form 

Continuation sheet Sheridan Park H.D. Item number 1 



data entered 



Th 



Thence in a southerly direction along center line of said alley to 

the intersection with the north property line of 4409 Clark Street; 
Thence in a westerly direction along said north property line of 

4409 Clark Street to the intersection with the east line of 

Clark Street; 
Thence in a southerly direction along said east line of Clark 

Street to the intersection with the north line of Montrose Avenue; 
Thence east along said north line of Montrose Avenue to the rear 

property line of 4401 Clifton Avenue; 

Lence in a northerly direction along the rear property line of 

4401, 4411-29, and 4431-41 Clifton Avenue to the intersection 

with the north property line of 4441 Clifton Avenue; 
Thence in a westerly direction along said north property line of 

4441 Clifton Avenue to the intersection with the east line of 

Clifton Avenue; 
Thence diagonally across Clifton Avenue to the intersection of the 

west line of Clifton Avenue with the north property line of 4436 

Clifton Avenue; 
Thence in a westerly direction from said intersection of the west 

line of Clifton Avenue with the north property line of 4436 

Clifton Ave, along said north property line of 4436 Clifton 

Avenue to its intersection with the center line of the alley 

between Clifton and Racine Avenues; 
Thence south along the center line of said alley to the 

intersection with the north property line of 4433 Racine Avenue; 
Thence west along said north property line of 4433 Racine Avenue 

to the intersection with the east line of Racine Avenue; 
Thence diagonally across Racine Avenue to the intersection of the 

west line of Racine Avenue with the north property line of 4434 

Racine Avenue; 
Thence west along said north property line of 4434 Racine Avenue 

to the intersection with the center line of the alley between 

Racine and Magnolia Avenues; 
Thence north along center line of said alley to its intersection 

with the north property line of 4543 Magnolia Avenue; 
Thence west along said north property line of 4543 Magnolia Avenue 

to the intersection with the east line of Magnolia Avenue; 
Thence north along said east line of Magnolia Avenue to the 

intersection with the south line of Wilson Avenue; 
Thence east along said south line of Wilson Avenue to the 

intersection with the center line of the alley between Magnolia 

and Racine Avenues; 
Thence north along the center line of said alley to its 

intersection with the south property line of 4616 Racine Avenue; 



United States Department of the Interior ,__._,,-_„_ 

National Park Service *»»ps.»»™» 

received 



National Register of Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form 



date entered 



Continuation sheet 



Sheridan Park H.D. itemnumber 10 Page 



Thence east along said south property line of 4616 Racine Avenue 

to the intersection with the west line of Racine Avenue? 
Thence north along said west line of Racine Avenue to the 

intersection with the south property line of 4631 Racine Avenue; 
Thence east along said south property line of 4631 Racine Avenue 

to the intersection with the rear property line of said property; 
Thence in a northerly direction along the rear property lines of 

4631-37, 4641, 4645, and 4649-57 Racine Avenue to the 

intersection with the south line of Leland Avenue; 
Thence west along said south line of Leland Avenue to the 

intersection with the west line of Racine Avenue; 
Thence north along said west line of Racine Avenue to the 

intersection with the north property line of 4732 Racine Avenue; 
Thence west along said north property line of 4732 Racine Avenue 

to the intersection with the center line of the alley between 

Racine and Magnolia Avenues; 
Thence north along center line of said alley to its intersection 

with the south line of Lawrence Avenue; 
Thence west along said south line of Lawrence Avenue to its 

intersection with the east line of Clark Street, that is, the 

point of origin. 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service '« Hn "" <»* 

National Register of Historic Places •***»> 
Inventory— Nomination Form .winter* 

Continualion sheet Sheridan Park Item number 10. ^°f a P hica1 <*& ■ 



Verbal Boundary Description 

(1) A list of all extant buildings is found on the continuation pages of Item 7 
(Description). Pages 13-17. 

(2) A map showing the boundary is found on continuation page 19, Item 7. 

(3) The following street addresses characterize property in the district; 
Here all corner properties are assigned addresses on north-south streets: 

West side of Clark: 4532-58 

East side of Clark: 4401-09, 4451-57,4545-4711, 4751-61 

All of Dover, Beacon and Maiden streets 

All of the west side of Magnolia street 

East side of Magnolia: 4401-4543, 4601-4755 

West side of Racine street: 4400-34, 4616-4732 

East side of Racine street: 4401-33, 4631-59 

West side of Clifton street: 4400-36 

East side of Clifton street: 4401-41 

(4) Justification of the boundaries is found on page B, Item 7, Description. 



Untted States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form 

Continuation sheet Sheridan Park Hist. Pi strictltem number 10 

UTM References (continued) 
I. 16 445400 4646140 
J. 16 445350 4646140 
K. 16 445350 4646220 
L. 16 445290 4646220 



9/ Major Bibliographical References 

The Economist (weekly newspaper) Chicago, 1891-1929 

Ancient permit files, City of Chicago 

Tract book, Recorder of Deeds, Cook County Illinois 

10. Geographical Data 

Acreage of nominated property about 11/ 
Quadrangle name Chicag o Loop, IL 
UT M References 

4 UJ IM ill I i I i L 



J 



Zone Easting Northing 

cLU I I . I . * I I.I 

eL_J I I i I i i I , I 

6l_J I I i I i i l- 1 - ■-- 1- -> -I 'I < I 



Quadrangle scale 



I I.. I M I I I I . I I ! 



Easting Northing 

I I i I i i I Li_L 



Zone 

°[_U 

f|_U I I i I i i I I i I i L 



■ I ! ■ i L 



J- L 



Verbal boundary description and justification 

See Continuation Sheet 



List all states and counties for properties overlapping state or county boundaries 



state 


code 


county 


code 


state 


code 


county 


code 


11. 


Form Prepared By 







etit!e Martin C. Tangora 



organization Sheridan Park Neighbors Association 

street & num ber 4636 M agnolia 

city or town Chicago 



date 21 July 1985 
telephone (312)-878-Z118_ 
***** Illinois 60640 



12. State Historic Preservation Officer Certification 

The evaluated significance of this property within the state is: 

national state -JS- local 



As the designated State Historic Preservation Officer for the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (Public Law 8 
665), I hereby nominate this property tor inc^istarrtf the National Register and certify that it has been evaluated 
according to the criteria and procedures'S^forth^jfr^j^Bti qnal Paifeser vice. -- 




&" 



For NPS use only 

I hereby certify that this property is included In the National Register 



Keeper of the National Register 
Attest^ 



Chief of Registration 



The following properties were also entered in the National Register but were excluded from a di- 
notiee: H " 

ILLI-TOIS, Cook County, Chicago, Sheridan Park H istoric District, Roughly bounded by Lawrence.'! 
Racine, and Montrose Aves., and Clark St. (12/27/85) 

MAINE, Andro scoggi n County, Lewiston, Wedgewood, Dr. Milton . House. 101 Pine St. (01/10/86) '\- 
MAINE, Aroostook C ounty, Presque Isle, Elmbrook Farm Barn. Parsons Rd (01/10/86) 
MAINE, Hancock County, Bucksport, Prouty, Jed, T avern it Inn, 52-54 Main St. (01/10/86) 
MAINE, Hancock C ounty. Ellsworth, Ellswor th City Hal l, City Hall Plaza (01/10/86) 

MASSACHUSETTS, Berksh ire County, Great 3arrington, United States P ost Office-Great Barrlnzton 

Main Pos t Office. 222 Main St. Toi/10/86) — ' B 

MASSACHUSETTS, Middlesex County, Sherborn, Assington (Sherborn MRA), 172 Forest St. (01/03/86) 
MASSACHUSETTS, Middlesex County, Sherborn, Bullen-S tra tton--Coz zen House (Sherborn MRA) 52 

Brush Hill Rd. (01/03/86) — — '■> 

Mi 4 fr?.» C n USErT5 ' Middles ex County, Sherborn, Clark-Northrup House (Sherborn MRA), 93 Maple St. 
MASSACHUSETTS, Middlesex County. Sherborn, Cleale, Joseph, House (Sherborn MRA). 147 Western 

MASSACHUSETTS, Middles ex County, Sherborn, Dowse, Rev. Edm und, House (Sherborn MRA) 25 

Farm Rd. (01/03/86) ' " 

MASSACHUSETTS, Middl esex County. Sherborn, Edward's Plain— Dowse's Corner Historic District 

(Sherborn MRA), N Main St. between Eliot and Everett Sts. (01/03/86) ~ 

MASSACHUSETTS, Mi ddlesex County, Sherborn, Fleming, Thomas, House (Sherborn MRA), 18 Maple 
St. (01/03/8B) 

MASSACHUSETTS, Middl esex County, Sherborn, Goulding, Eleazer , House (Sherborn MRA). 137 

Western Ave. (01/03/86) ° 

MASSACHUSETTS, Middlesex County. Sherborn, Holbrook, Charles. House (Sherborn MRA). 137 S 

Main St. (01/03/86) ' — J 

MASSACHUSETTS, Middlesex County, Sherborn, Leland, De acon William, House (Sherborn MRA) 27 

Hollis St. (01/03/86) ^ — ' 

MASSACHUSETTS, Midd lesex County, Sherborn, Lewis, Charles P., House (Sherborn MRA), 81 Huntins 

Ln. (01/03/85) " B 

MASSACHUSETTS, Middlesex Cou nty, Sherborn, Morse, Da niel, HI, House (Sherborn MRA). 210 Farm 

rid. (01/03/86) 

MASSACHUSETTS, Midd lesex County, Sherborn, Morse— 3arber House (Sherborn MRA). 46 Forest St. 

(01/03/86) 

MASSACHUSETTS, Middlesex County, Sherborn, Morse-Tay-Leland-H awes House (Sherborn MRA) 

266 Western Ave. (01/03/86) — : " 

MASSACHUSETTS, Middlesex County, Sherborn, Sanger, Asa, House (Sherborn MRA). 70 Washington 

°t. (01/03/8(3} 

MASSACHUSETTS, Middlesex County, Sherborn, Sanger, Richa rd. Ill, House (Sherborn MRA), 60 

Washington St. (01/03/86) ' ' ' ! " 

MASSACHUSETTS, Middlesex County. Sherborn, Sawin— Sullen— 3ullard House (Sherborn MRA) 60 

Brush Hill Rd. (01/037861 ' " 

MASSACHUSETTS, Middlesex County, Sherborn, Sewall-Ware House (Sherborn MRA), 100 S. Main St.